Online Teaching & Technology Blog

Center for Online Learning, Research and Service @ Illinois Springfield

Author: Emily Boles

Enroll Users in Blackboard

  1. Go to the Control Panel.
  2. Click on Users and Groups, and then Users.
  3. Click on the “Find Users to Enroll” button.
  4. Next to Username, type the UIS NetID (not their email address) of the person you wish to enroll.
    • If you do not know the NetID of the person you wish to enroll, you will need to look it up. Click the “Browse” button. Search for the person by Last Name, First Name, or Email address. Check the box next to the name of the user, and click Submit.
    • If you need to enroll more than one person, separate the NetIDs with a comma only — no spaces. (E.G.: jsmit1,mgarc2,jdoe7)
    • If you have requested a guest account for a person who does not have a UIS email address, the e-mail address of the guest is used in the place of the UIS NetID.
  5. Choose role of user(s): student, instructor, teaching assistant, or course builder are the only functional roles in Blackboard at UIS.
    • Instructor and Teaching Assistant allow people to edit your class and view the Grade Center.
    • If you have a guest that you’d like to access your course materials but not the Grade Center, please use the role of “student,” as the role of “guest” will not allow them to view the course.
  6. Click Submit.

If you cannot find the person in Blackboard, s/he may already be enrolled in your course or may not yet have a NetID. Please contact COLRS for help.

Assignment Submissions for Students — Spring 2018 Changes

The inline grading tool in Blackboard is not functioning. When you submit an assignment on Blackboard during Spring 2018, submitted assignments will look a bit different. Please review the instructions and images below to

  1. Click on the title of your assignment in Blackboard.
  2. You’ll notice that the submission screen remains the same. When you are ready to submit your work, please click on the Browse My Computer button to select a file.

    A screen capture of the Upload assignment page in Blackboard.

    The assignment submissions screen in Blackboard. Students click on Browse My Computer to select a file to submit for grading.

  3. Click Submit to turn in your work.
  4. The Review Submission History page appears after you submit a file. Notice the green success message displayed at the top of the page and that the title of your file appears on the page where you would have seen the first page of your document previously.

    Screen capture of the Review Submission History page after submitting a file to a Blackboard Assignment.

    The Review Submission History page shows that the submission was successful. The green bar with a success message and the title of the submitted file appear on the screen.

Grading in Blackboard without the Inline Grader Function

The inline grading tool for Blackboard Assignments is not functioning. We’ve identified two work-arounds for this issue. If you would like to continue using an inline grading function, consider creating a Turnitin Assignment to replace the current Blackboard assignment. You can also learn to grade a Turnitin Assignment. The other work-around, described below, is to download the student’s work, mark it up in Microsoft Word or other text editor, and upload the document to the course grade center.

  1. In the Grade Center of your course, locate an assignment that is ready for grading, which is denoted by the exclamation mark icon.
    Screen capture of the full grade center with one assignment submitted by one student, shown by a yellow exclamation mark icon.
  2. Hover your mouse over the Exclamation mark and click on the down arrow that appears.
  3. On the menu that appears, click on “Attempt mm/dd/yy”
    Screen capture of the Full Blackboard Grade Center, with context menu for a submitted assignment showing. Click on the Attempt option to view your student's work.
  4. Click on the Assignment title (in blue text on the right side of the page) to download the assignment. Most files will end in .doc or .docx.
    screen capture of Assignment Details page in Blackboard Grade Center. Click on the name of the file to download your student's work.
  5. Open the document and type your feedback or use Track Changes. When you’re finished grading, save it to your computer.
  6. To upload the document with your feedback, click on the blue Attempt area. In the textbox that appears, click on the small paperclip icon. Select your file and click Open.
    Screen capture of the Assignment Details pane in Blackboard Assignment grader. click on the Attach/paperclip icon to attach your edited work document to the assignment.
  7. The name of the file should appear as a link in the textbox. Enter the grade for the student and click Submit.
    Screen capture of the Assignment Detail page in Blackboard Grade Center. A link to an attached document with instructor feedback is shown in the textbook. Enter a grade for the student. Click Submit to save your work.Enter a grade for the student. Click Submit to save your work.

The Future of Work: The Augmented Workforce

Keeping abreast of current and future workforce trends provide insight and ideas for new and enhanced skill development options when updating or creating new academic course content.  According to Deloitte Insight’s, The  Future of Work article and video, the paradigm-shifting forces such as cognitive technologies and the open talent economy are reshaping the future workforce, driving many organizations to reconsider how they design jobs, organize work, and plan for future growth.  Review the figure below for a quick comparison of changing  workforce rules that need to be adopted for leading, organizing, motivating, managing, and engaging the 21st-century workforce.

Image of a two column chart that provides a comparison of old rules versus new rules as it relates to the future of work.

4 Strategies for Using Video More Effectively

On the Learn, Lead, Grow blog, Matt Bergman shared 4 Tips for Using Video More Effectively. These tips are easy to integrate!

Do Captions Help Students Learn?

The WCET Frontiers Blog featured Dr. Katie Linder, Oregon State University Ecampus, who discussed a national research project on student use of closed captions and transcriptions. The Oregon State University Ecampus Research unit and 3Play Media worked together to conduct a national study on student uses and perceptions of closed captions and transcriptions.

The important results show that while these resources are not yet widely available, many students, even those who may not need these resources as an accommodation, are able to use transcriptions and captions to increase their success.

Creating Video Lectures

Narrated lectures, when properly structured and brief, can be a good tool to deliver course content to your students.

Chunk Your Content

We recommend that you “chunk” your lectures into smaller manageable pieces no longer than 5-7 minutes. Chunking accomplishes three things for you. First, by breaking the lectures into brief topics, the likelihood of being able reuse a lecture in another course increases. Second, it is easier to update or re-record a single short video than a longer video. Third, it is easier for your students to find time to sit and concentrate for less than 10 minutes.

Write a Script

Remember to write a script for your lectures. It will help keep you from using verbal fillers and keep your videos brief, but more importantly, the script gives an alternative content piece to present to students who cannot hear your lecture and for visually impaired students. It is also very easy to create captions for your lecture by using the YouTube caption editor.

Use Images & Visual Explanations

Narrated PowerPoint lectures give you the opportunity to present your materials in a visual way, and can help you reach students who are visual learners. Try to include images that enhance your lecture. Replace text descriptions with visual representations of your topic — flow charts, graphs, diagrams, photographs, artwork, maps. Visuals will add value to your lecture and help to keep you from reading every word on your slide — something that students could easily do for themselves.

Creating video lectures using PowerPoint

Voice Training

Aerobics for your voice: Tips for sounding better on-air (NPR Article)

Last Access Date in Blackboard Not Accurate

As of January 2017, the “Last Access” Column in Blackboard’s Grade Center and Performance Dashboard is not accurately reflecting student activity.

In the example below, all the students have posted to the discussion board and two have submitted quizzes, yet only two of the students have a date in the “Last Access column in the Grade Center or Performance Dashboard.

Screen capture of Grade Center with inaccurate "last access" dates.

ITS cannot install the update to fix this issue until after the Spring 2017 semester ends. Thus, for reporting the date of last attendance for students earning a grade of F, faculty will need to run a report to get accurate dates for last student access.

Retrieving Accurate Student Course Access Data

You can retrieve accurate data on your students’ course access by running the Course Activity Overview report.

In your course, go to Control Panel and click on Evaluation > Course Reports. Select the report you wish to run:

  • Course Activity Overview – gives you 2 graphs. One shows the hours of aggregated user activity by day. The second shows the number of hours each student has spent in the course; if you click on the bar for any student, it will show you the hours the student spends in the course each day and the time spent in the activities in the course.
  • Overall Summary of User Activity – gives you charts with summary data for all students on areas of access and time of day access, plus a table with the individual number of times students accessed the course each day.

View specific instructions on running course reports.

Converting Articulate Lectures to Kaltura Videos

If you have your original PowerPoint and Audio files, you can convert them to videos that can be uploaded to Kaltura.

  1. First, convert the PowerPoint and audio files to an .mp4 video using PowerPoint. If you do not have audio files outside of the PowerPoint/Articulate proprietary format, the audio files can be exported for this process.
  2. After the video file has been uploaded to Kaltura, you may add chapters to the video to mimic the table of contents feature in Articulate.
  3. The final step in any video creation for use at UIS is to be sure a transcript

Grading with Rubrics

How to Grade With Rubrics

Before grading with a rubric, you need to associate it with one of the following gradable items:

  • Assignments
  • Essay, Short Answer, and File Response test questions
  • Blogs and journals
  • Wikis
  • Discussion board forums and threads

Watch a Tutorial

Double-click the video to enlarge the viewing area.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvN0Q4jPd-c?rel=0]

Use the following steps to grade using rubrics:

The Raw Total displays the score rounded to two decimal places.

  1. Access the gradable item in the Grade Center, on the Needs Grading page, or from the tool.
  2. Click View Rubric to review or begin grading with the associated rubric.
  3. In Grid View, click a cell to apply that point value to the grade. If a rubric with point ranges is used, select the appropriate value from the drop-down list. To change the selection, click another cell in the same row. Optionally, type Feedback to the student in the text box that appears when a cell is selected.
  4. Optionally, click List View to switch displays and select an option for each criterion to apply that point value to the grade. Optionally, select the check boxes toShow Descriptions for criteria and to Show Feedback text boxes.
  5. A running Raw Total score appears as you make point selections. Optionally, type a score in the Change the number of points box to override the selected score, and type overall Feedback to the student using the full features of the content editor.
  6. When grading is complete, click Exit to leave the rubric without saving your selections, or click Save to save the score and feedback and return to the attempt. Click Save and Next to use another associated rubric for evaluation.

Blackboard Test Feedback and Results Options

In the Show Results and Feedback to Students section, you can set which results and feedback are available to students after they complete a test or survey. You can set one or two rules using the drop-down lists. You cannot choose some rules in combination. After you select a rule in the first drop-down list, some may not appear in the second drop-down list.

If conflicts in rules occur, the most permissive settings for that user or group of users is granted. For example, students will receive the greatest number of attempts and longest availability time.

The following image shows the two default options applied to tests: After Submission and Score per Question. If you make no changes in this section, students see their overall test scores and the scores earned for each individual question after they submit their tests. Select more options to determine what else they see, such as the correct answers or your feedback.

Students can always see their overall test scores. You cannot change that option from this page. If you do not want them to see their scores yet, access the Grade Center column’s contextual menu and hide the column from students. However, when you hide a test column from students, they see nothing about the test in My Grades. When they access the test in the content area, they receive a message stating when they submitted the test. No scores appear.

The following table provides descriptions of the test and survey feedback options. Click the images to enlarge them in your browser. Use your browser’s back function to return to the topic.

Option Description
When You must make a selection. Set when appropriate test results and feedback are shown to students:

  • After Submission: This is the default option.
  • One-time View: After students submit their tests or surveys, the selected results and feedback options are in effect for students to view ONCE. However, students can always view the scores they earned unless you hide the Grade Center column from students. Immediately after a student navigates away from the test or survey, any other results and feedback are restricted. You can change the setting -OR- add another rule for a second viewing. A second rule is not combined with the one-time view rule, but is applied separately. To learn more, see One-time View for Results and Feedback.
  • On Specific Date: View results and feedback after the selected date and time.
  • After Due Date
  • After Availability and End Date
  • After Attempts are graded: After all students submit the test or survey, and all attempts are graded, results and feedback are made available to students. If one or more students do not submit an attempt, you must assign a grade of 0 so that all students can view the chosen results and feedback.
Score per Question Show the score earned for each test question. This is a default option for tests only. Clear the check box if you do not want to show scores for individual questions.
Answers You can allow students to see information about their answers:

  • All Answers: Show all answer options.
  • Correct: Show the correct answers—tests only.
  • Submitted: Show all of a student’s submitted answers.

Example 1: Show more feedback

When students access their tests, they see their overall scores, each question’s score, and all answer options. They see their submitted answers marked as correct or incorrect, and any feedback provided.

Example 2: Show less feedback to discourage cheating

If students are taking a test at different times, you can make a limited amount of feedback available until all students submit the test.

For the first rule, select After Submission in the first drop-down list and clear the check box forScore per Question. Make no other selections. After submitting their tests, students can only see their overall test scores.

For the second rule, select After Due Date, and select options to show more results and feedback. You can create an announcement to notify students that additional feedback is available to view.

Feedback Show instructor-generated feedback for each question. This option appears only for tests.
Show Incorrect Questions Show the questions a student answered incorrectly or partially incorrectly. This option appears only for tests. You might consider only showing incorrect questions when allowing multiple attempts so that students can focus their studying on those areas.

One-time View for Results and Feedback

In the Show Test Results and Feedback to Students section, you can select One-time View. After students submit their tests, the results and feedback options you selected are in effect for students to view ONCE. However, students can always view the overall test scores they earned. Immediately after a student navigates away from the test, any other options you chose are restricted. You can apply a second rule to allow students to view newly selected options at a later time. The second rule is not combined with the one-time view rule, but is applied separately.

The ability to select different options for each rule allows you to show some test results and feedback initially, and then more later.

Rule #1: Select One-time View and Show Incorrect Questions. Select no other options so that while other students are still allowed to take the test, no one can share the correct answers.

Rule #2: Select all of the following options:

  • After Due Date
  • Score per Question
  • All Answers
  • Correct
  • Submitted
  • Feedback

After the due date, students see their scores along with all answer options. They also see their submitted answers marked as correct or incorrect and any instructor feedback.

About Unavailable Tests and Surveys

You manage availability to students when a test or survey is deployed on in a content area of your course (e.g., Course Materials or Assignments), by click on the “item options” button Blackboard editi item button on the Test Options or Survey Options page.

Unavailable and deleted tests and surveys differ in the following ways:

  • Unavailable tests and surveys deployed in a content area do not appear to students. When Edit Mode is ON, instructors and course builders can see unavailable tests.
    • You can limit test and survey availability to a specific time period with the Display After and Display Until dates and times. If the link to a test or survey is available, but neither date is set, it is immediately and always available.
  • If you delete a test or survey from a content area in your course, it is removed from that location. You can deploy it again as needed. You can deploy each test and survey in one location only.
  • If you delete a test or survey from the tests or surveys tool pages, it is permanently deleted from your course. This is irreversible. You can access the tests and surveys tools in the Course Tools section of the Control Panel.

Wrapping Up the Semester – Tips for Teaching Online

Learn our top tips for wrapping up your online course, including the best practices for ensuring good returns on your course evaluations.

Wrapping Up the Semester Handout

Blackboard for All and Course Site Organization

Every course at UIS — on campus, blended, and online — is assigned a Blackboard course site.

Faculty who teach face-to-face may choose whether to use the site. An announcement is posted in each course site to let the students know that its use if the instructor’s prerogative.

Blackboard tutorials are available on the searchable COLRS Online Teaching and Technology Blog (the blog you are on right now). It is updated frequently.

Blackboard Course Site Overview

Blackboard is a web-based learning management system that UIS instructors use to organize course content.

Log in from UIS Homepage under Quick Links or go directly to the UIS Blackboard login page.

The general course environment

In Blackboard, you can easily navigate, provide content, edit items, and change options that affect how users interact with your course.

  1. Course menu: The access point for all course content.
  2. Control Panel: The area after the course menu is your access point for course management functions, such as course style, course tools, and users. Students don’t see the Control Panel.
  3. Student preview: You can review course content and validate course behaviors from a student’s perspective. You’re logged in with a student account—the preview user account—and enrolled in the current course.
  4. Edit Mode: When Edit Mode is ON, all the instructor functions appear, such as Build Content or the appearance of menus. When Edit Mode is OFF, all instructor functions are hidden. The Edit Mode function appears to users with a role of instructor and teaching assistant.
  5. Action bar: Rows at the top of the page that contain page-level actions such as Build Content, Search, Delete, and Upload. The functions on the action bar change based on where you are in your course. The action bar can contain multiple rows of functions such as on the main Grade Center page.
  6. Menus: An Options Menu icon appears for components with menus, such as content items, course menu links, or Grade Center columns. The options in the menu vary based on the component.

Some content from Blackboard.

Excelsior Online Writing Lab (OWL)

Excelsior Online Writing Lab (OWL)

http://owl.excelsior.edu

About

The Excelsior Online Writing Lab (OWL) is a highly-interactive, publicly-available and media-rich online writing lab designed to help students make the transition to college-level writing. In 2014, the Excelsior OWL – ESL Writing Online Workshop (WOW) won the 2013 Distance Education Award by the National University Technology Network (NUTN).

The Excelsior OWL offers videos, interactive PDFs, video games, quizzes, Prezis

Home Page and Learning Areas

From the Excelsior OWL Home Page you can access all of the learning areas, as well as “Additional Resources” found in the header, and “Acknowledgements”, found in the footer.

Each learning area has its own landing page, with access to the content, as well as the “How to Use OWL” and “Additional Resources” pages. Depending on the learning area, there may be additional options available on the landing page.

Page Navigation – How to Use the OWL

Once inside a learning area, you will see the online writing lab menu on the left side of the screen. The active learning area is highlighted, at which point all of the topics for that learning area are displayed below it.  Some of the topics have multiple sections.

Quizzes

The built-in quizzes allow students to check their understanding of a particular section of the OWL. Examples include – paraphrasing quiz, punctuation, and digital writing.

ESL-WOW

For ESL students using the ESL-WOW area of the OWL, they will learn to:

  • Generate Ideas
  • Develop a Thesis
  • Map Ideas
  • Revise, Cite
  • Edit and Polish

Ideas for using the Excelsior OWL for online or blended classes

  1. Send students to individual links within the OWL

For example, if students are to provide an annotated bibliography, provide a link to the Annotated Bibliography page.  Another example, the Literature review section, which includes a prezi.

  1. Refer students back to the OWL in your feedback

For example, if the student has provided a weak thesis statement, you may provide a link to the Thesis section, or a specific section (such as Stating your Thesis) within the Thesis section.

  1. Support student understanding of plagiarism

The Avoiding Plagiarism section of the OWL provides a thorough overview of the topic of plagiarism.  With audio, video, and supporting documentation, students will develop a keen understanding of what constitutes plagiarism and how to avoid it.  The pre-test and post-test provide a method for students to track their progress.

Blackboard Test and Survey Availability Options

When you deploy a test or survey to a content area, you set the availability and feedback options. To make changes to the options, access its contextual menu and click Edit the Test Options or Edit the Survey Options.

The following table provides descriptions of the test and survey availability options. Click the images to enlarge them in your browser. Use your browser’s back function to return to the topic.

Option Description
Make the Link Available You can set this to available, and then use the Display After and Display Until fields to limit the amount of time the link appears.
Add a New Announcement for this Test/Survey You can create an announcement for a test or survey. The announcement includes the date and states, “An assessment has been made available in [Course area that includes the link to the assessment].”If an announcement was previously posted using this feature, the date and time of the most recent announcement appears.
Multiple Attempts You can allow students to take a test or survey multiple times. The status of multiple attempts appears to students at the top of the test or survey. Select Allow Unlimited Attempts to allow students to take it as many times as they want. Select Number of Attempts and provide the amount of attempts.With multiple attempts for a test, you can also select which attempt’s score to use in the Grade Center from the Score attempts using drop-down list.

Image illustrating associated text

Force Completion If you select Force Completion, students must complete the test or survey when they launch it.Students may only access the test or survey ONE TIME. The Save function is available for students to save the questions as they work through them, but they may not exit and reenter the test or survey. In the instructions, Force Completion is noted and explained to students. If you do not enable Force Completion, students may save their progress, navigate away, and return to complete the test or survey.If students accidentally close their browsers, leave the test or survey page, or lose power or their internet connections, they cannot continue. They must contact you to allow them to start over with a new attempt.

You may want to reserve the Force Completion option for when students are on campus taking a proctored test and connected to an Ethernet cable instead of Wi-Fi. If issues occur, an instructor can be available to reset the test.

Alternatively, use the Set Timer options to reduce receiving emails from panicked students who accidentally left a test or survey with Force Completion enabled.

Set Timer Set a time limit for finishing a test or survey. Type the amount of time in the hours and minutes boxes. During a timed test, the time elapsed is displayed to students. As students approach the time limit, a one-minute warning appears.When an attempt is complete, student completion time is available in the Test Informationsection.

If a student saves and exits the test, the timer continues. For example, if he begins the test on Tuesday, saves and exits it, then completes it on Thursday, his completion time will be 48 hours.

If you set the timer, turn on Auto-Submit to automatically save and submit a test or survey when time expires. Without enabling auto-submit, students have the option to continue after time expires. Tests and surveys are flagged as submitted after the timer expired. You have the option to adjust the grade based on the time.

You may find it advantageous to use the Set Timer options and not the Force Completion option. For example, if a student loses his internet connection for 10 minutes on a timed test, at least he can access the test again and continue. If you enabled the Forced Completion option, he cannot access the test again and must contact you to reset the test.

Display After Optionally, select the date and time when the test or survey will become available to students. You can control availability through the Make the Link Available option without setting specific dates.
Display Until Optionally, select the date and time the test or survey will be made unavailable to students.
Password You can require and type a password for students to use to access a test or survey. Passwords have a limit of 15 characters and are case sensitive.
Restrict Location You can require students to take the test or survey in a specific location. Students outside of this location are not able to take the test or survey.

This is based on a range of IP addresses created by your institution. If your institution has not created this range, this option does not appear.

To learn more, see Restrict Tests by Location.

Test Availability Exceptions For existing availability settings, you can make exceptions for individual students or groups. Use exceptions to provide an accommodation to a student who is disabled, or for technology and language differences.

For a test with one attempt, you can allow more attempts for a student who is blind and using screen reader technology for the first time.

Image illustrating associated text

If the settings exist for a test or survey, you can create the following exceptions:

  • Number of attempts
  • Timer
  • Availability
  • Force completion
  • Restrict location
Due Date If you use grading periods in the Grade Center, set a due date to easily include that test or survey in a grading period and on the calendar in the My Blackboard menu.

Image illustrating associated text

 

Due Date and Late Submissions

To prevent late submissions, you can select the check box for Do not allow students to start the Test/Survey if the due date has passed. Students receive a message after the due date, notifying them that the test or survey can no longer be completed.

When you allow late submissions, they are clearly marked on the following pages:

  • Needs Grading
  • View All Attempts
  • Review Test Submission
  • Grade Details

Content from Blackboard

Option Description
Include this Test in Grade Center Score Calculations You can include this test in Grade Center calculations. If the test is not included, the score does not affect any Grade Center calculations.
Hide Results for this Test Completely from Instructor and the Grade Center You can hide this test score from you and exclude it from Grade Center calculations. The display in the Grade Center will read Complete/Incomplete and N/A or zero appears on the Grade Details page. You cannot see students’ answers to questions. Students are able to view their own scores.Selecting this option makes Include this Column in Other Grade Center Calculations and Show Statistics (average and median) for this Column to Students in My Grades unavailable when editing column information in the Grade Center.

New York Public Library Makes 180,000 High-Res Images Available Online

The New York Public Library’s digital collections are vast. In early January 2016, they added more than 180,000 of its public-domain holdings to the digital collection. Visitors will find maps, posters, manuscripts, sheet music, drawings, photographs, letters, ancient texts, all available as high-resolution downloads. “These changes are intended to facilitate sharing, research and reuse by scholars, artists, educators, technologists, publishers, and Internet users of all kinds,” the library says in a statement.

Documents range from literary manuscripts and sheet music to maps, atlases, and stereoscopic views. The library also notes that the documents include Farm Security Administration photographs, papers from Founding Fathers, WPA-era art by African-American artists, the 16th-century Handscrolls of the Tales of Genji, and illuminated manuscripts from the Medieval Ages and the Renaissance.

The materials can be viewed and downloaded at the Digital Collections site.

Having trouble imagining what 180,000 images might look like? The NYPL also created a visualization of all the materials, sorted by date, genre, collection or even color.

Other cool projects that the NYPL has created — to fuel inspiration for others to use their open API of the collection:

  • a game based on public-domain mansion floor plans
  • a comparison of 1911 street photos with 2015 Google Street View images
  • a trip planner based on a guide to where black visitors would be welcomed in the 1930s-1960s

A sampling of the newly-available high-res images from the NYPL:

A lithograph of New Orleans, by the artist Henry Lewis and the lithographer Arnz and Co., is among the more than 180,000 public domain items now available for high-resolution download from the New York Public Library.

A lithograph of New Orleans, by the artist Henry Lewis and the lithographer Arnz and Co., is among the more than 180,000 public domain items now available for high-resolution download from the New York Public Library.

The public domain release includes more than 40,000 stereoscopic views — like this one of female prospectors in 1898.

The public domain release includes more than 40,000 stereoscopic views — like this one of female prospectors in 1898. B.W. Kilburn/New York Public Library

"Muhammad and Abu Bakr are feted by Umm Ma'badah's tribe," from a 16th-century illuminated manuscript depicting the life of the prophet Muhammad.

“Muhammad and Abu Bakr are feted by Umm Ma’badah’s tribe,” from a 16th-century illuminated manuscript depicting the life of the prophet Muhammad.

An early-20th century photo by Edwin Levick, "Uncle Sam, host. Immigrants being served a free meal at Ellis Island," is part of the NYPL's photography collection.

An early-20th century photo by Edwin Levick, “Uncle Sam, host. Immigrants being served a free meal at Ellis Island,” is part of the NYPL’s photography collection.

The NYPL's digital holdings include the papers of notable Americans: letters from Walt Whitman, journals by Nathaniel Hawthorne, receipts from Alexander Hamilton --€” and George Washington's recipe for "small beer." (http://exhibitions.nypl.org/treasures/items/show/130

The NYPL’s digital holdings include the papers of notable Americans: letters from Walt Whitman, journals by Nathaniel Hawthorne, receipts from Alexander Hamilton –€” and George Washington’s recipe for “small beer.”

(A transcription of Washington’s recipe is available here.) 

The NYPL's digital collections include a number of maps in the public domain, like this 1672 world map by Pieter Goos.

The NYPL’s digital collections include a number of maps in the public domain, like this 1672 world map by Pieter Goos.

Copy Blackboard Course Content

Though Blackboard course shells will be created with an empty template, you may wish to copy materials from your other Blackboard course sites.  Copying your Blackboard site is a multi-step process: (1) copy your Blackboard course materials, (2) clean up discussion boards, if needed, and (3) delete any empty or duplicated content areas or links, and (4) update your course content.

To Copy Content from an older course into an empty course at the start of each semester:

  1. Go to your course that contains the content you wish to copy (from a previous semester or your Gold course).
  2. Go to the Control Panel, select “Packages and Utilities” > “Course Copy”
  3. Under “Select Copy Options,” click “Browse” to display a list of all courses in which you are an instructor.
  4. Select the empty course into which you wish to copy your content (circle to the left of the course name). Click Submit.
  5. Check the boxes next to the items you wish to copy. Please consider the following:
    • Do NOT check Announcements. Copying Announcements can be confusing for students unless you intend to hide all old announcements from your new students.
    • Always check “Settings” to retain the menu colors and any banner images you use in your course.
    • If you use GRADED assignments or tests, be sure to check ALL “Content Areas,” “Grade Center Columns and Settings,” and “Tests, Surveys and Pools.”
    • If you use GRADED discussion forums, be sure to check “Discussion Board” and “Grade Center Columns and Settings.”
    • For Discussion Board, you have a choice:
      “Include starter posts for each thread in each forum (anonymized)”  – This option copies all the initial posts in the forum. When you access the new Blackboard site’s discussion board, it will let you select any user or “anonymous” for the person who posted the threads.
      OR
      “Include only the forums, with no starter posts.”  – This option means you do not need to clean up student posts inside your discussion forums.
  6. Under “File Attachments,” ALWAYS select the default “Copy links and copies of the content.” The other two options may cause broken links in your course.
  7. For “Enrollments” NEVER check “Include Enrollments in the Copy.” Copying enrollments will mix your current and former students in your new Blackboard site.
  8. Click “Submit.”
  9. You will receive an email when the copy process is complete. At times the email will arrive a few minutes before the materials are visible in your course. You may need to log out of Blackboard and log back in to see the copied content.

Clean up Copied Discussion Boards
If you copied your discussion board starter threads from an old course to your new course, be sure to click on Discussions. When you do, you’ll be prompted to select anonymous or any user in the course as the author of all copied discussion threads.

If you copied discussion threads you did not wish to keep, be sure to delete them. To delete posts quickly:

  1. Go to your course Discussion Board.
  2. Click on the name of a forum to view any threads posted to the forum.
  3. To quickly select all postings, click on the top checkbox in the gray bar.
  4. Uncheck any posts you wish to reuse. For example, some instructors post questions inside the discussion forums to which students respond.
  5. Click on the “Delete” button to remove any posts with checkmarks.
  6. Repeat with remaining discussion forums.

What is the TEACH Act?

The Technology, Education, and Copyright Harmonization Act (TEACH Act) of 2002 is an amendment to the Copyright Act of 1976 that addresses online education. It is sometimes referred to as Section 110(2) of the copyright law.

TEACH Act resources:

What is fair use?

Fair use is the right of the public to reproduce portions of a copyrighted work without permission for purposes such as scholarly criticism, parody, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research.

Fair use resources:

  • Section 107 of the Copyright Act – lists the four factors that courts use when determining whether a use of a copyrighted work is fair use
  • An explanation of fair use and a checklist by Columbia University Libraries/Information Services

What is the public domain?

Public domain works have expired copyrights or were never protected by copyright law. You do not need permission to use or copy public domain works. Examples include U.S. government works, laws, and work published in the U.S. prior to 1923.

Public domain resources:

What is Creative Commons?

Creative Commons (CC) licenses help creators of content retain copyright while allowing others to copy, distribute, and make some uses of their work. Creative Commons licensing works with copyright, not in place of it, when you want to grant certain rights in your copyrighted work. All CC licenses require users to attribute the original creator of a work.

Creative Commons resources:

  • Watch a video to learn more about CC licenses
  • See creativecommons.org to learn more, use a license-choosing tool for your own work, or search for creative commons work

Content provided by Blackboard.

What is Copyright?

The United States government states “Copyright is a form of protection grounded in the U.S. Constitution and granted by law for original works of authorship fixed in a tangible medium of expression. Copyright covers both published and unpublished works.” Source: Copyright in General by www.copyright.gov.

Copyright law resources:

Content provided by Blackboard.

Effective Online Teaching Practices

Technology is secondary.

COLRS Teaching and Technology blog: http://blogs.uis.edu/colrs/

UIS Information Technology Services: http://www.uis.edu/informationtechnologyservices/

Communication is key.

Keep students informed.

Be clear.

Syllabus is the center of your course.

Course Calendar – Keep dates in one location.

Make your course materials accessible.

Be present.

Discussion Board

Writing discussion questions.

CREST+ Model: Writing Effective Online Discussion Questions

UW Oshkosh Discussion Tips and Pointers

Announcements

Email

Be consistent.

Create a consistent day and time for deadlines.

Create a consistent format for your course.

Give feedback within established parameters.

Ask for and provide feedback.

Rubrics

Rubric Evaluation Reports

Two Sample Blackboard Rubrics

Blackboard Rubrics Workshop

Grading Rubrics in Blackboard written info

Graded Assignments Workshop Recording

Turnitin Assignment

Discussion Grader

Announcements

NetID-Authenticated anonymous feedback tool

 

Specifics for UIS

Check roster in Faculty Self Service. Blackboard is not the system of record.

Enter Grades in Faculty Self-Service

End-of-course Evaluations

Strategies for increasing response rates

Evaluations at UIS

Student -drop emails from ITS – Hiding and Removing Students from your course

Disability Services

Stay informed.

Faculty Focus is an excellent resource to locate the latest trends in online education. See recent articles and sign-up for email or RSS updates when new articles are posted.

University of Central Florida’s Teaching Online Pedagogical Repository

 

UIS Blackboard Archive Policy

As an ongoing effort to ensure that Blackboard runs as quickly and as efficiently as possible, a Blackboard Archival Policy will go into effect July 1, 2015.

The Blackboard subcommittee (comprised of representatives from ITS, COLRS, and online coordinators) researched practices of other universities, consulted with the Registrar, and proposed a recommendation to the Academic Technology Committee as well as the Campus Senate. Both groups endorsed the policy.

Courses will be retained on Blackboard for 3 years, on a single server (http://bb.uis.edu), after which they will be purged. As of Fall 2015, the courses available in Blackboard will be Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Summer 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Summer 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015, and Summer 2015. All older courses will be purged.

Moving forward, each semester the oldest courses will be deleted from Blackboard, keeping the course load at 3 years. Faculty will receive a reminder prior to the deletion.

Please be aware that there are options for retaining course content longer than three years. Instructions for each option are linked below.

  • Use Blackboard’s built-in tool for archiving courses
    • The Export/Archive Course tool creates a zip file that contains all the content for the course.
    • Save the .zip file to your UIS Box.com or Google Drive storage space
    • The zip file can be then be re-imported into Blackboard at a later time, if needed
  • Request a GOLD course from COLRS
    • Many faculty already take advantage of GOLD courses, which serve as a template. GOLD courses are not taught from; they are merely a course shell where faculty can keep updated content that can easily be copied to live course as needed.

Read the policy approved by the Academic Technology Committee and the Campus Senate. If you have any questions, please contact COLRS at colrs@uis.edu or Kara McElwrath at kmcel2@uis.edu.

Quickly access this post with http://go.uis.edu/bbarchive

How to create narrated video lectures in PowerPoint

  • First, open your PowerPoint presentation.
  • Make sure the presentation is saved as a Macro-Enabled PowerPoint Presentation (.pptm)
  • For each slide you wish to narrate:
    1. Go to the slide.
      1

    2. Click ‘Insert’ -> ‘Media’ -> ‘Audio’ -> ’Record Audio’.
      2

    3. To begin recording, click the record button. It has a red circle.
      3

    4. Read the content for that slide. Make sure to speak into your microphone. 
    5. To stop recording, click the stop button. It has a blue square.
      4

    6. Optional: To test that your recording sounds acceptable, click the play button. It has a green triangle.
      5

    7. Click ‘OK’ when finished to complete the recording for the slide.
      6

    8. Repeat these steps for each slide you wish to narrate.
  • Finally, you can export to video when audio recording has been completed.
    1. Click ‘File’ -> ‘Export’ -> ‘Create a Video’.
      7

    2. For the video quality, select ‘Computer & HD Displays’ to ensure the highest quality.
      8

    3. For timings and narrations, select ‘Use Recorded Timings and Narrations’ to ensure your recordings are included in the video.
      9

    4. Optional: If you have slides without narration, you can adjust the default duration of 5 seconds for these slides.
      10

    5. Click ‘Create Video’. You can name your video and select where to save it.
      11

Now that you’ve created your video, follow these instructions to upload the video to Kalutra through Blackboard.

Students Who Are Parents

The Institute for Women’s Policy Research completes research “conducts rigorous research and disseminates its findings to address the needs of women, promote public dialog, and strengthen families, communities, and societies” (source).

In November 2014, IWPR published a fact sheet on college students who are also parents, and over a quart of them are. Read the students who are parents fact sheet

Open Educational Resources – Cable Green

Cable Green, Director of Global Learning at Creative Commons, led a discussion of “eTextbooks and Open Educational Resources” to help University of Illinois Springfield (UIS) student leaders understand the local and global education opportunities when digital content, the internet and open licensing are combined. View the recording of Cable Green’s lecture.Movie Fifty Shades Darker (2017)

Including Video in an Online Course

Videos can enhance your course by offering examples, explanations of concepts, and can be a visual for your students to refer to when learning new content.

There are several ways to add video to your course:

Hollywood movies or documentaries (copyrighted)

Brookens Library has many films freely available through film collections to which the campus subscribes. If you find a video you would like to include, contact the library for help linking to it in your Blackboard site.

If the film you wish to show is not available in these collections, it may be available in the library’s film collection or available for purchase. The library can work with you to find obtain copyright clearance for the film.

You can also request that your students find a film at a local library or video store. Contact your Brookens Library Liaison for help teaching your students to use the WorldCat database to find films at their local library.

Free videos from the Web

YouTube and Ted.com are just two of many great sites for free video on the Web. The embed codes provided by sites like these make it easy to add the videos to Blackboard.

To embed a video player from Ted.com or YouTube.com in your Blackboard course site:

  1. Copy the embed code from the video website.
  2. Go to your Blackboard course.
  3. In the upper right corner of your Blackboard site, make sure Edit Mode is ON.
  4. Click on the content area in which you would like the video to appear (for example, Course Materials or Course Information).
  5. Click on Create Item.
  6. Enter the title of your video next to Name.
  7. In the Text box that appears on the screen, click on the HTML button to view the HTML code.
  8. Paste the embed code you previously copied.
  9. Click Submit.

Create your own video

Check out a digital video camera from ITS or record your screen using Camtasia Relay. Once you have created your video, you need to put up for your students to see it.

Please upload the video to Kaltura Media through Blackboard. Learn more about Kaltura Media here.

Hints about videos in online courses

  • Remember that large files can take a long time to download if a student has dial up internet service. Please be careful not to upload videos directly into your Blackboard course. Always link from an outside source as stated above.
  • Videos should supplement content. Use videos to explain text book content more in depth, create examples of concepts, and extend the learning environment with outside curriculum resources.
  • Other purposes for video in your course might be:
    • Introduce yourself to students
    • Student presentations
    • Specific examples of past projects
    • Feedback on assignments

Request Electronic Library Reserves

E-Reserves are a way of placing documents on hold and linking them in your course for your students to observe for a short period of time. These items can supplement your online instruction and can offer your students a plethera of information that can enhance their online learning experience.

Reserve resources and review the Library policies for E-Reserves

Ideas for including E-Reserves in your course include:

  • Streaming media to offer examples of concepts
  • Journal articles used for example and research
  • Case studies for course application and assessment

Submit Final Grades

Both on-campus and online courses have the same deadlines for reporting student grades.

To Enter Grades in Banner:

  1. Go to https://apps.uillinois.edu/selfservice/
  2. Click on UIS.
  3. Login with your UIS NetID/Password.
  4. Click on Faculty & Advisor Services.
  5. Then click Faculty Services.
  6. Click on Final Grade Entry.
  7. Select the desired semester and class.
  8. Enter your grades.
  9. Click Submit to complete the process.

SoftChalk at UIS

SoftChalk is a tool to help enhance text-based lectures. It allows instructors to “chunk” their content into smaller pages, add images, flashcards, graded or self-test quizzes, and more. Learn more about SoftChalk.

Instructors may access SoftChalk using Citrix Virtual Desktop. View instructions for installing and using the Virtual Desktop app.

Import Test Questions to Blackboard with Respondus

Respondus allows instructors to import questions from a text file and upload them to Blackboard courses.

To import questions from a text document to Respondus, instructors must format the text file in a specific (and simple) manner. Learn about the Respondus Question Import Format (pdf).

Once the text document is formatted, upload the questions following these instructions (pdf).

Kaltura Media Overview

Kaltura Media is the video management solution at UIS. Faculty and students may upload video from other sources (MS Lync, camcorders or phones) or record web cam and/or screen capture videos through Kaltura Capture Space Lite. A fantastic feature of Kaltura is the statistics for video use. It will tell you the percentage of your video that each student watch, how many times it was access, and the average view time. Across UIS, the average view time for a video is 7 minutes and 35 seconds, which is on the longer side of the recommended 5-7 minute length for video lectures.

For detailed videos on how to use Kaltura, please see the Kaltura Company’s training videos on Kaltura and Capture Space Lite.

UIS Kaltura Resources

Access and Upload Videos to Kaltura Media

Faculty and students access Kaltura Media through Blackboard.

  1. Go to the “My Blackboard” tab and locate the My Media module on the page. Click on “My Media.”
  2. Click on “Add New” and then select “Media Upload.”
  3. Click “Choose a file to upload” and select your file.
  4. Your video will upload automatically. Depending on the size, this may take a while.
  5. After your video uploads, edit the name, description, tags (key words), and privacy settings.
  6. Click “Save”  to complete the upload process.
  7. Follow the steps in this post to add your video a Blackboard course.

Video Lectures

Beginning in Fall 2014, faculty may reserve time in the COLRS Faculty Video Recording Studio to record lectures or interviews. The room is equipped with a high quality video camera, lighting, microphone, green screen, and a computer for editing videos with Camtasia Studio.

Please contact COLRS to discuss your project.

Using Turnitin as a Student

Turnitin is plagiarism detection software available to faculty at UIS. To learn more about using Turnitin as a student, including helpful videos, please see http://www.uis.edu/colrs/students/turnitin/.

You may also find the Turnitin Manual for Students (pdf) a helpful resource.

 

Submit a Turnitin Assignment for a Student

Whether it is to spot check for suspected plagiarism or submit an assignment for a student with computer problems, instructors may submit a student file to a Turnitin Assignment they have created in their Blackboard course site.

  1. Go to the Blackboard course that contains the Turnitin Assignment.
  2. Go to Control Panel > Course Tools > Turnitin Assignment.
  3. Click on the assignment name.
  4. Select the student’s name from the “Author” drop down list.
  5. Enter a title for the paper.
  6. Click on “Choose from this computer” button to upload the file, and the find and select the student’s paper.
  7. Click the “Upload” button.
  8. Next, you’ll see a preview of the file you submitted. If this is the correct document, click “Submit.”
  9. Once the paper has been submitted, you will see the Turnitin Digital Receipt.
  10. Click on “go to inbox” to see the listing of papers submitted for this Turnitin Assignment.

Watch a video on how to submit a student paper to a Turnitin Assignment in Blackboard.

Educause Quarterly issue on Online Student Retention includes UIS strategies

Sustaining Students: Retention Strategies in an Online Program

by Emily Boles, Barbara Cass, Carrie Levin, Raymond E. Schroeder, and Sharon McCurdy Smith

Published on Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Key Takeaways

  • With students spread across 47 states and a dozen countries, the University of Illinois at Springfield faces a significant challenge in promoting student persistence.
  • Program coordinators who know each student majoring in their online degree program keep in close touch with those students to assure that their learning and academic planning needs are met.
  • Online student peer mentors who model best student practices and serve as a liaison between students and faculty members provide effective support in selected classes.
  • These and other approaches have resulted in an online course completion rate that hovers just two to three percent below the on-campus completion rate, and the degree-completion rate among online students is equally strong.

Read the complete article at: http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/sustaining-students-retention-strategies-online-program

Adding TEC-VARIETY — Book by Curt Bonk and Elaine Khoo

Adding TEC-VARIETY is the latest book by Curt Bonk of Indiana University, written in collaboration with Elaine Khoo, from the University of Waikato in New Zealand.

It is an OPEN book, which means it is freely available online. Download your copy at http://tec-variety.com/

Endorsement:

What a grand book! This is going to be a highly valuable resource for countless instructors and designers in online learning. “Adding TEC-VARIETY” is unique in that it combines the theoretical and pedagogical foundations of effective learning with 100 easy-to-implement activities that promote the engagement of online students in deep learning. These strategies can instantly breathe life into courses that fail to tap the enthusiasm and imagination of students. TEC-VARIETY has become a handbook for my design of engagement in online classes.

Ray Schroeder, Associate Vice Chancellor for Online Learning and Founding Director of the Center for Online Learning, Research and Service (COLRS), University of Illinois Springfield

Adding Kaltura Media Videos to Blackboard Courses

Kaltura Media is a media management tool built into Blackboard. Recordings made with Capture Space Lite are automatically published to Kaltura. You may also upload videos you’ve created with other tools to Kaltura. Learn More about Kaltura and Capture Space Lite.

Thumbnail

The thumbnail option adds a preview image to the content area of your Blackboard. When students click on the video, it opens to full size.

  1. Navigate to your course and the content area to which you would like to add the video.
  2. Click on “Tools,” and select “Kaltura Media.”
  3. Enter your search terms (name of the video or any descriptive tags you added to your video) and click the search icon. Also, know that the most recently published videos appear at the top of the list.
  4. Click “Select” next to the video you wish to add to your course.
  5. Enter a descriptive title for the video.
  6. Click “Submit.”

Embed

  1. Log in to Blackboard.
  2. On the “My Blackboard” tab, locate the “My Media” box on the left side of the page and click on “My Media.”
  3. Enter your search terms (name of the video or any descriptive tags you added to your video) and click “Go.” Also, know that the most recently published videos appear at the top of the list.
  4. Click on the video you wish to add to your course.
  5. Click on Actions to show the menu, and then select Edit.
  6. Click on the “Share” button that appears below your video, in the lower right corner. It looks like  an arrow pointing left (See image below.)
    Kaltura Media Share button is on far right
  7. Click on the Embed Code  (bottom choice) and and copy it ( CTRL + C  or Command + C) to copy the embed code to your computer’s clipboard.
    screen capture of the Kaltura Media Share screen. The link to share the video and an embed code are displayed.
  8. Next, go to your course content area (Weekly Materials, Assignments, Syllabus, etc).
  9. Click on “Build Content,”  and then “Item.”
  10. Enter a descriptive name for the item.
  11. In the text box, be sure your menu is expanded (see image below).
    ExpandTextboxEditor
  12. Click on the “HTML” button on the text box menu. This will open a pop-up window. Paste (CTRL + V or Command + V) the code you copied to the clipboard in #6 and click “Update.”
  13. Click Submit.

Link

  1. Log in to Blackboard.
  2. On the “My Blackboard” tab, locate the “My Media” box on the left side of the page and click on “My Media.”
  3. Enter your search terms (name of the video or any descriptive tags you added to your video) and click “Go.” Also, know that the most recently published videos appear at the top of the list.
  4. Click on the video you wish to add to your course.
  5. Click on the “Actions” button that appears below the video. (See image below.)
  6. Click “Edit.”
  7. Click the “Share” icon in the lower, right-hand corner of the video. (See image below.)
  8. Click the the URL (it should begin https://cdnapisec.kaltura.com…), and press Press CTRL + C to copy the URL to your computer’s clipboard.
  9. Next, go to your course content area (Weekly Materials, Assignments, Syllabus, etc).
  10. Click on “Build Content,”  and then “Web Link.”
  11. Enter a descriptive Name for the item.
  12. Paste (CTRL + V or Command + V) the code you copied to the clipboard in #8 in the “URL” area.
  13. Under “Web Link Option,” select “yes” to open the video in a new window. If you do not open the video in a new window, students will not be able to view the video.
  14. Click “Submit.”

Add to Course Gallery

The course gallery option allows you to add a link to your course menu that takes students to all videos for your course.

Add a Course Gallery Link to your course menu

  1. Go to your course.
  2. Click on the “+” above your course menu.
  3. Choose “Tool Link”
  4. Enter a name for the link (Media Gallery or Course Videos, perhaps).
  5. Select “Media Gallery” for the Type.
  6. Check the box to make the area available to users.
  7. Click “Submit.”

Add a video to your course gallery

  1. Log in to Blackboard.
  2. On the “My Blackboard” tab, locate the “My Media” box on the left side of the page and click on “My Media.”
  3. Enter your search terms (name of the video or any descriptive tags you added to your video) and click “Go.” Also, know that the most recently published videos appear at the top of the list.
  4. Click on the video you wish to add to your course.
  5. Click on the “Actions” button that appears below the video. (See image below.)
  6. Click “Publish.”
  7. Select “Published,” and then select the individual courses to which you would like to publish the video to the media gallery.
  8. Click “Save.”

UIS Blackboard Guest Accounts

At times, UIS faculty and staff may need to request guest users for Blackboard. Examples of uses for Blackboard guest accounts are:

  • Community members participating in band or chorus activities
  • Off-site supervisors for internships
  • Guest lecturers/presenters for courses

Blackboard accounts may be requested by completing this form: http://go.uis.edu/bbguest

Important information about UIS Blackboard guest accounts:

  • UIS faculty or staff must request Blackboard guest accounts.
  • The UIS employee who requests the guest account is responsible for enrolling the guest in the appropriate Blackboard site.
  • Blackboard guest accounts are deleted each year on August 1st to ensure security of our learning management system. If guest needs to have access again, a new guest account must be requested.

 

View Blackboard Assignment Feedback from Your Instructor

To view Feedback on Individual or Group Assignments in Blackboard

This contains instructions for viewing feedback on Blackboard Assignments for which you uploaded a file to an assignment with this icon beside it:

bbassignmenticon

  1. In your course, click on My Grades in the course menu.
  2. You will see a list of all the assignments in your class.
  3. Locate the assignment you wish to see feedback on.
  4. If your instructor has given you a grade, click on the title of the assignment to view feedback.
  5. If you submitted a Word document (.doc or .docx), PowerPoint (.ppt or. pptx) or PDF (.pdf), the feedback screen will look like this:
    instructor feedback croc doc(click on the image to enlarge it)
  6. If your instructor left feedback on the paper itself, scroll through the document to read it. To download a copy of feedback of this feedback, click on the download bb assignment feedbackdownload button above the document on the screen.
  7. If your instructor attached feedback in a file, click on the name of the file to view or save it.

My Grades Item Status

The following table describes the symbols appearing on the My Grades page.

 
Symbol Description
Item has not yet been completed. No information is available.
Item has been submitted. This item is waiting to be reviewed by your instructor.-OR-Item has been submitted. Your instructor may review this item but may not be provided a grade (for items such as surveys).
Grade Item has been graded. Click the grade or assignment title to view detailed feedback.
Attempt is in progress. This item has not been submitted. To submit the item, see Submitting a Draft Assignment.
Grade is exempted for this user. If you do not complete this assignment, it will not affect your grade.
Error has occurred. Contact your instructor.

UIS Online Supplemental Evaluation Tool

The UIS online supplemental evaluation system allows faculty to administer anonymous surveys to their students. Faculty choose up to ten questions from a bank of 64 questions. Students log into the supplemental evaluation site with their UIS NetID and take the survey. If the survey is administered prior to the last two weeks of the semester, instructors see the anonymous student feedback immediately. If the survey is administered during the final two weeks of the semester, faculty may see the feedback after grades are posted. View the full description of the supplemental evaluation system.

FACULTY Online Supplemental Evaluation System

STUDENT Online Supplemental Evaluation System

Create an Evaluation 

  1. Log in to the Faculty side of the Online Supplemental Evaluation System.
  2. Click on “Create/Modify Evaluation Form” in the left menu.
  3. Click on the “Create New Evaluation Form” link.
  4. Enter the name of your evaluation in the “Version Description” field.
  5. Check the box next to the questions you would like to include. You may select up to ten.
  6. Click “Submit” to save your evaluation.

Schedule Your Evaluation

  1. Log in to the Faculty side of the Online Supplemental Evaluation System.
  2. Click on “Schedule Evaluation” in the left menu. 
  3. Click on the “Create New Schedule Entry” link.
  4. Fill out the scheduling form.
    1. Choose your course for
    2. Select the version (name of your evaluation).
    3. Choose the begin and end date.
    4. Enter any comments (notes for the instructor).
    5. Click “Submit.”
  5. Send or post the following link for your students to complete the evaluation:
    https://uisapp-s.uis.edu/ose/

Retrieve Evaluation Results

If your evaluation ends prior to the last two weeks of the semester, you may log in to see results immediately. If your evaluation ends during the last two weeks of the semester, you will be able to access the results after final grades are posted.

  1.  Log in to the Faculty side of the Online Supplemental Evaluation System.
  2. Click on the “Evaluation Results” link in the left menu. 
  3. Click on the link in the “Course” column to view the results of your evaluation.

Time Management in the Online Classroom

Laurel Newman, Te-Wei Wang and Marcel Yoder led an excellent discussion about time management in online teaching. Watch the recorded Blackboard Collaborate session to learn their strategies.

Group Work: Considerations for the Instructor

When should we use group work?

In  the Faculty Focus article “How to Design Effective Online Group Work Activities,” Mary Bart writes that we should “design tasks that are truly collaborative, meaning the students will benefit more from doing the activity as a group than doing it alone.”  Her articles goes on to quote Jean Mandernach:

“Too often we give students an activity and call it group work when in reality it’s something they could do on their own. Then we get frustrated when they don’t work together and just do the work on their own.”

The article recommends group work for assignments for which:

  • “There’s no right answer, such as debates, or research on controversial issues.”
  • “There are multiple perspectives, such as analyzing current events, cultural comparisons, or case studies.”
  • “There are too many resources for one person to evaluate, so a jigsaw puzzle approach is needed with each student responsible for one part.”

Be sure to check out the “Online Group Work Instructor Checklist” at the end of the article. 

Assessing Individual Contributions to Group Work

How do I assess individual contributions?

Use technology. Promote the use of tools that capture individual contributions through versioning. Examples of tools provided by UIS:

Implement peer evaluation. Allow group members to evaluation one another and themselves and incorporate this evaluation into the final grades for the group project.

  • Google Forms can be used to collect data in a spreadsheet for analysis and grading. View a sample form.
  • Asking each student to fill out a worksheet and submit it through the assignments tool in Blackboard is another option. View a sample worksheet.

Resolving Conflicts in Online Group Work

Often group conflicts aren’t revealed to the instructor until the end of the project. Encouraging or requiring progress reports or feedback from students at specific intervals may help you to identify trouble spots. 

For semester-long projects, a mid-semester feedback form is useful. In “Online Groups and Social Loafing: Understanding Student-Group Interactions,” Piezon and Donaldson suggest including multiple evaluation points so that “group members are aware that their contributions are salient and being observed by others. Members who are performing poorly are given several opportunities to increase their performance.”

Another strategy is to prevent conflicts by keeping the groups on track and on task by requiring small deliverables for the project throughout the semester. 

Viewing Narrated Lectures (Impatica) for Students

This video covers how to us the controls for Impatica lectures. It covers the especially important method for switching between Flash and HTML5 mode for viewing the lecture in different browsers. If you create narrated lectures using Impatica software, you may want to share this video with your students.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cR4n_hPBFVw]

Blended Learning Toolkit

http://blended.online.ucf.edu/

“Based upon proven research and informed by practical experience, this Blended Learning Toolkit will offer guidance, examples, professional development, and other resources to help you prepare your own blended learning courses and programs.”

Constructivism

The following is from Constructivism and Online Education by Doolittle:

Constructivism is a theory of knowledge acquisition, not a theory of pedagogy; thus, the nexus of constructivism and online education is tentative, at best. Constructivism posits that knowledge acquisition occurs amid four assumptions:

  1. Knowledge involves active cognizing by the individual.
  2. Knowledge is adaptive, facilitating individual and social efficacy.
  3. Knowledge is subjective and self-organized, not objective.
  4. Knowledge acquisition involves both sociocultural and individual processes.

These four assumptions have led, indirectly, to eight primary pedagogical recommendations:

  1. Learning should take place in authentic and real-world environments.
  2. Learning should involve social negotiation and mediation.
  3. Content and skills should be made relevant to the learner.
  4. Content and skills should be understood within the framework of the learner’s prior knowledge.
  5. Students should be assessed formatively, serving to inform future learning experiences.
  6. Students should be encouraged to become self-regulatory, self-mediated, and self-aware.
  7. Teachers serve primarily as guides and facilitators of learning, not instructors.
  8. Teachers should provide for and encourage multiple perspectives and representations of content.

The question then arises, can an online medium support this pedagogy that is based on the constructivist assumptions?

More on Constructivism

Proctored Exams

Some UIS instructors may require proctored exams. When a UIS online student needs to take an exam, he or she will be required to make arrangements in advance for the exam to be proctored (supervised).

COLRS offers some forms that may be helpful for instructors and students in arranging for proctors. Please see the Online Teaching at UIS: Proctored Exams page for more information.

Hide and Remove Users in Blackboard

When you wish to restrict a student’s access to your Blackboard course due to a drop or withdrawal, you have two options: hide or remove the user.

Option 1: Hide the Blackboard Course from Student, but Retain Student Grades

  1. Go to the Control Panel and click on Users and Groups > Users.
  2. Select “Username” and “List All” in search options and click Go. All users will be listed.
  3. If you have more than 25 students, click on the “Show All” button in the lower right corner of Blackboard to view all students on one page.
  4. Hover over the name of the student whose access you wish to restrict, and click the dropdown arrow.
  5. Choose “Change User’s Availability in Course.”
  6. Under “1. Available (this course only),” select “No.”
  7. Click Submit.
  8. The student will no longer have access to your Blackboard, but will be visible in your Grade Center.

To hide a student in your Grade Center:

  1. Go to Control Panel.
  2. Click on the dropdown arrow next to Grade Center.
  3. Click on Full Grade Center.
  4. Click on the “Manage” button, and select “Row Visibility.”
  5. Check the box next to the student that you wish to hide.
  6. Click on the “Hide Rows” button.
  7. Click “Submit” to save your changes.

Option 2: Delete student from Blackboard and delete student’s work
Removing a student from your Blackboard course roster also removes his or her grades from the Blackboard Grade Center.

If you would like to remove a student from your course, you can do so by following these steps.

  1. Go to the Control Panel and click on Users and Groups > Users.
  2. Select “Username” and “List All” in search options and click Go. All users will be listed.
  3. If you have more than 25 students, click on the “Show All” button in the lower right corner of Blackboard to view all students on one page.
  4. Hover over the name of the student whom you wish to delete, and click the dropdown arrow. (This will also delete all grade records in Blackboard for that student.)
  5. Choose “Remove Users from Course,” and click “OK.”

If you need assistance to hide or remove students from your Blackboard course, please contact COLRS (http://www.uis.edu/colrs/contact.html)

Short URL for these instructions: http://go.uis.edu/hidestudents

Make Blackboard Course Available to Students

To make a course available to students:

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ft5-EafYdvY]

  1. Go to the Control Panel.
  2. Click on Customization > Properties.
  3. Under Set Availability, choose “Yes.”
  4. Click Submit.