Research in Online Teaching & Learning

Center for Online Learning, Research & Service at the University of Illinois Springfield

Category: Research Archives (page 1 of 3)

The Impact of Open Educational Resources on Various Student Success Metrics

An interesting research article titled “The Impact of Open Educational Resources on Various Student Success Metrics”  by  Colvard, Edward Watson, and Park was recently published in the International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education.  It discusses the impact of open education resources (OERs) on student success.  They found that OERs not only save students money, but they also improve end-of-course grades and decrease DFW rates.  The full article is available online.

E-Learning Research Report 2017: Analysis of the main topics in research indexed articles

This new report from the eLearn Center, Universitat Oberta de Catalunya, provides information about where research efforts in e-learning are being focused, identifying all the subject areas and determining their significance and trends.  Leading the list of most frequently researched topic is Mobile Learning.   The report is available online.

Journal Article: Developing Communication Confidence and Professional Identity in International Online Collaborative Learning

UIS Chemistry Associate Professor & Department Chair Layne Morsch recently co-authored an article in Chemistry Education Research and Practice.  The article “Developing Communication Confidence and Professional Identity in Chemistry through International Online Collaborative Learning”  discusses the impact of an online collaborative assignment between two flipped organic chemistry classrooms, one in Canada and the other in the United States, on learners.  Co-authors are Darlene Skagen, Brett McCollum, and Brandon Shokoples.

The SAGE Handbook of E-learning Research

For a limited time, SAGE Knowledge is providing free access to The SAGE Handbook of E-learning Research.

Online Learning Efficacy Research Database

Oregon State University has created a searchable, filterable database of online learning efficacy research.  It includes academic studies on the learning outcomes of online and or hybrid education in comparison to face-to-face environments.

Gap Analysis Research by UIS Faculty

UIS faculty Karen Swan, Bill Bloemer, and Scott Day have recently published a peer-reviewed article is entitled Gap Analysis: An Innovative Look at Gateway Courses and Student Retention.  The article “use examples from our work with the analyses of student records to show how one can use student type and point in their academic life to predict success in particular gateway courses.” It was published in the 2017 OLC Conference Special Issue of Online Learning (Vol. 21, No. 3).

Bringing Carl Rogers’ Core Conditions into the Online Environment: Using Empathy, Genuineness, and High Regard to Engage Students and Build Success

UIS Faculty Denise Sommers, Brian Chen, and Martin Martsch recently presented at the Online Learning Consortium Innovate Conference.  A synopsis of the research, entitled “Bringing Carl Rogers’ Core Conditions into the Online Environment: Using Empathy, Genuineness, and High Regard to Engage Students and Build Success,” is available as a handout.  Dr. Chen is currently serving as a COLRS Faculty Fellow and Dr. Sommers is a prior COLRS Faculty Fellow.

Identifying Strategies for Revitalizing Legacy Online Programs: Overcoming Barriers to Innovation

Members of the UIS community will be leading a discussion entitled “Identifying Strategies for Revitalizing Legacy Online Programs: Overcoming Barriers to Innovation” at the Online Learning Consortium (OLC) Innovate Conference on Thursday, April 6, 2017 in New Orleans, LA.  Presenters include Laurel Newman, Carolee Rigsbee, Carol Jessup, Donna Rogers Skowronski, Michele Gribbins, and Emily Boles.

The discussion will include the challenges faced when introducing innovations designed to strengthen the quality of an online degree completion program with a 10-year record of relative success.  Barriers to innovation of legacy programs and potential solutions for overcoming these barriers will be explored.  More information about the presentation can be found at the OLC Innovation Conference website.

New Publications by EDL Faculty

Research on the pedagogies used in Massive Open Online Courses completed by Education Leadership faculty members Karen Swan, Scott Day & Len Bogle was presented at two conferences and appeared in a publication.

  • Swan, K., Day, S. & Bogle, L. (2016). Exploring Pedagogies of MOOC’s through Three Metaphors for Learning. In Proceedings of Global Learn 2016 (pp. 311-334). Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE).
  • Swan, K., Day, S. & Bogle, L. (2016). “Metaphors for Learning and MOOC Pedagogies” at the Learning at Scale Conference in Edinburgh, Scotland.
  • Swan, K, Day, S., & Bogle, L. (2016). “Exploring Pedagogies of MOOC’s through Three Metaphors for Learning“ at the Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education Conference in Limerick, Ireland.

Their presentation on the metaphors for learning is available on Prezi.

Flipping Organic! With iPads using iTunes U and the ChemWiki

UIS Associate Professor and COLRS Faculty Fellow Layne Morsch recently presented the following poster at the 251st American Chemical Society National Meeting in San Diego, CA.

Description: Organic chemistry classes are highly problem solving oriented and can benefit greatly from active learning. Flipped teaching encourages active learning and has been used successfully for 6 terms at UIS to increase student engagement in organic chemistry. During this session, the adoption of a 1:1 iPad program will be described. An overview of how lecture videos were prepared will be provided along with different methods of delivering this content to the students. These video lectures have allowed greatly increased time to work on interactive activities during the face-to-face component of the course. Students take advantage of several hands-on tools including: iTunesU, the ChemWiki, ChemDraw, Socrative, Notability, iBooks, Explain Everything, Adobe Voice, iMovie, and Chairs (an example of gamified chemistry content). Examples will be included of how these tools can be used creatively before class to encourage student preparation and during class sessions to enhance student participation. How each method encourages depth of understanding of organic chemistry and the impact on student interaction levels will be illustrated. Student attitudes will be reported as well as academic performance on internal exams and standardized exams.

Flipping organic ACS 2016 poster

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