What is Zoombombing?

Zoombombing is a new form of Internet trolling in which a participant uses Zoom’s screensharing features to interrupt and disrupt meetings and classes.​  Many Zoom sessions, including several universities classes, have experienced Zoombombers this week.

How Can You Prevent Zoombombing in Your Classes?

You can use your meeting and host settings to prevent students from distracting other students in your class session, as well as preventing unwanted participants from joining your class session. Some suggestions include:

  • Schedule your Class Session through Blackboard – ​Faculty can create, schedule, and launch Zoom sessions from within Blackboard, and students can easily join those sessions without the link URL being shared.
  • Do​n’t Use Your Personal Meeting ID for Class Sessions – Your Personal Meeting ID is one continuous meeting that can be used by anyone who has access to it.  Scheduling your class session through Blackboard​ is more secure. 
  • Use a Password – You can require your students to enter a password to enter the meeting. 
  • ​Use the Zoom Waiting Room – The Waiting Room feature allows you to control when a participant joins the meeting. 
  • Remove Unwanted Participants – If an unwanted participant joins your Zoom session, you can remove them from the session by hovering over their name in Participants menu.  
  • Lock Your Meeting – Once your class is in session using Zoom, you can lock your meeting.  By locking your meeting, no additional participants are able to enter your class. (Keep in mind that this can be a disservice for students who experience connectivity challenges or other disruptions that prevented them from joining on time.)
  • Disable a Participant’s Video – ​Zoom hosts can disable unwanted or distracting videos of students.
  • Mute Participants – Zoom hosts can block unwanted, distracting, or inappropriate noises by muting individual or all students. You can also enable Mute Upon Entry in your Zoom settings.
  • Manage Screen Sharing – You can prevent students from screen sharing during a class session by using the host controls at the bottom of the meeting window.  Click the arrow next to Share Screen, then click Advanced Sharing Options. Choose Host Only under the Who can share? setting.
  • Disable Chat – Zoom has in-meeting chat, which allows students to message the entire class or specific individuals within the class privately. You can restrict students’ ability to chat with other individuals while your class is going on.  Keep in mind that preventing students from chatting with the entire class will prevent them from asking questions without using their microphone.​
  • Disable File Transfer – File transfer allows people to share files through the in-meeting chat​. If File Transfer is not needed for your class session, you can disable the File Transfer option in the Meeting tab. 
  • Disable Annotation – With Zoom’s annotation feature, students can mark up content during screen share. You can disable the annotation feature in your Zoom settings to prevent people from writing all over the screens.

Despite the possible challenges associated with Zoombombers, Zoom continues to be a valuable learning tool that allows your students to maintain a sense of connectivity with you and their classmates.  You don’t need to use all of these preventive measures.  Choose one or two that allows you to use the Zoom to meet the needs of your class.  If you need help talking about which feature might be the best in your particular class, please contact COLRS at colrs@uis.edu


UIS Zoom Resources:

ITS Zoom Support Page at UIS
Consideration for Using Zoom as a Remote Classroom​