Online Teaching & Technology Blog

Center for Online Learning, Research and Service @ Illinois Springfield

Category: Assignments

Increase Engagement with Kaltura Video Quizzing

Kaltura offers the option for instructors to integrate low-stakes objective quizzes on videos that are used in courses. Paired with shorter videos (around 5-10 minutes), the quizzing option offers the possibility for increased student engagement and encourages students to watch videos all the way through. To get started, go to My Media inside any of your Canvas courses. Then:

  1. Click Add New and then select Video Quiz.
    video quiz button
  2. You will be taken to the Editor / Media Selection page, where you can either select an existing video or upload a new one.
  • To upload a new one, click the Upload Media button.
    upload media button
  • To use an existing video, scroll through the list and click Select next to the one you want to use for the quiz.
    select button
  1. From here, a window will open within your current tab where you can create your quiz questions. The quiz tool will allow you to insert questions into the video at specific intervals using the highlighted timeline tool and edit description and grading information for the quiz. This help document from Kaltura details the quiz creation and editing process, including screenshots.
  2. When you are finished adding quiz questions and updating the settings, click Done. The video quiz will now be available in My Media and can be added to a Canvas course, just like any other video hosted in Kaltura.
    done button
  3. If you wish to integrate your Kaltura video quiz into the Canvas gradebook, you will need to create a new Canvas assignment in a module or on your Assignments page in your course.
  4. For Submission Type, select External Tool.
    external tool selection
  5. Click the Find button.
    find button
  6. Scroll down until you see Kaltura Video Quizzing, and select it.
    Kaltura video quizzing selection
  7. Your My Media page will load in a small window within the tab, and a list of your available video quizzes will appear. Select a video quiz to use. This will take you back to the Configure External Tool page. Click Select to confirm your choice.
    select button
  8. Scroll to the Points field. Enter the total point value for your Kaltura Quiz.
  9. Click Save & Publish to make the assignment available to your students.

points field

There are several important points to keep in mind:

  • As a best practice, COLRS does not recommend this tool for high-stakes exams.
  • This feature is not compatible with Respondus Monitor or Examity.
  • Only objective (true/false or multiple choice) questions are gradable. Open questions and reflection points are not considered gradable and will not be counted in your students’ scores.
  • Kaltura treats each gradable question (true/false or multiple choice) as equal in value and will divide the total point value for the quiz by the number of gradable questions. For example, in a 10-point quiz with 2 gradable questions, each question will be worth 5 points.

Student Workload Estimator

Rice University has developed a nice workload estimator that you might consider using for your course. It is available at https://cte.rice.edu/workload.  

From the Center for Teaching Excellence at Rice:  Somewhat surprisingly, there is very little research about the amount of time it takes the average college student to complete common academic tasks. We have self-reported estimates of how much total time they spend on academic work outside of class (12-15 hours), but we don’t know much about the quality and quantity of the work that is produced in that time frame (let alone how the time is allocated to different tasks). We also know quite a bit about how students tackle common academic tasks, but those studies rarely ask students to report on how long it takes them to complete the task (whether reading a book, writing a paper, or studying for an exam). The testing literature provides some clues (because valid instrument design depends on data about the average speed of test takers), but it’s tough to generalize from the experience of taking high-stakes, timed tests to the experience of working on an assignment in the comfort of your dorm. And while there is a sizable literature on reading, the nature and purpose of the reading tasks in these experiments are also quite different from what students typically encounter in college.

Measuring Student Learning Outcomes

Lucinda Parmer from Southeastern Oklahoma State University has provided Alternatives to the Traditional Exam as Measures of Student Learning Outcomes​.  The article proposes many alternative means of assessing students including:

  • Collaborative testing
  • Student Portfolios
  • Performance Tests
  • Summaries
  • Briefing Reports
  • Presentations
  • Reflective Papers
  • Student-Proposed Projects
  • Experiential-Learning Activities
  • Poster Sessions
  • Fact Sheets
  • Gamification and Game-Based Learning
  • Service-Learning