Online Teaching & Technology Blog

Center for Online Learning, Research and Service @ Illinois Springfield

Category: Uncategorized

Thanks for the memories

Exactly three years ago tomorrow I began as the Campus Accessibility Specialist at UIS. As an alum I was very excited to be at UIS, and to work with a great team in COLRS. I began making my way across campus and met each department. I remember many of the encounters. After hearing faculty concerns, we began helping faculty by hiring student workers to work on the files for classes. We held workshops and FDOs. We expanded our focus by working on files for offices and the website.

We have worked on thousands of files for over 200 classes at UIS, and expanded our team of 4 student workers to 7. We have worked with hundreds of faculty at UIS to help them raise the bar on accessibility.

And it is here that I leave you, to move to a new accessibility position with the UI System office. This does not mean that I won’t be around, just less frequently. As part of my new position I will still be working with UIS as well as UIC and UIUC. And the student workers are left in good hands. One of the original student workers Alana Gomoll, who graduated in May 2020 will be leading the team of student workers.

So good bye, and keep up the great work at UIS!

Importing Course Content from Blackboard into Canvas

Course content created in Blackboard can be imported in Canvas by following these steps:

Remove Excess Grading Categories from your Blackboard Grade Center

Open the full Blackboard Grade Center

Go to Manage and choose Categories

Select Categories

You may see several empty grading categories. These appear and multiply each time you copy Blackboard content from one semester to the next. While these categories do not affect Blackboard, they can cause serious issues with the Gradebook and Assignments page in Canvas and, therefore, must be removed.

To remove the excess grading categories, click “show all” at the bottom of the page

choose "show all"

Next, click on the box to the left of the word “title” (this will “select” all empty grading categories) and click delete to remove excess grading categories.

arrows pointing to box and delete

Here is a video demonstration of this process.

Create Export Package

Once you’ve deleted the excess grading categories, you’ll need to create an Export Package (zip file) with your course content that can be imported into Canvas.

First, go to your Blackboard Control Panel and click on Packages and Utilities:

Arrow points to Packages and Utilities in Blackboard

Choose “Export/Archive Course” and click on “Export Package.”

From there, choose the content you would like to import into Canvas. You may select “all” or choose individual content areas and tools:

Content areas in Blackboard shown

Click “submit.”

When your Export Package is ready, you will receive an email message in your UIS email which tells you “the operation has been completed.”

When you go back to Packages and Utilities > Export/Archive course, you will see the Export Package ready to download.

Export Package in Blackboard ready to download

Click on the link to save it to your downloads.

Import Your Content to Canvas

Open your Canvas course.

On the right side of the home page, you will see a button called Import Existing Content:

import existing content button on canvas home page indicated

Under Import Content, select your content type (Blackboard 6/7/8/9) from the dropdown menu:

Arrow pointing to Blackboard 6/7/8/9 from the dropdown menu

Under “source,” choose the Blackboard Export File from your downloads. Choose “all content” or “select specific content” and then click “import.”

You’ll see a green indicator when the process has completed:

green indicator that importing process in complete

You’ll then be able to begin creating, rearranging, and updating your Canvas modules with your newly imported content.

Note: Canvas courses have a size limit of 500 MB. Export packages larger than 500 MB will not import properly. If your course exceeds the size limits, you may need to upload videos to Kaltura and/or move files to Box which can be shared to Canvas.

Here is a video demonstration of the export/import process.

Canvas Tip: What Do My Students See?

Using “Student View” in Canvas and Managing Course Navigation

Student View

To see the student’s perspective on Canvas, use Student View to view the course, post and reply to discussions, submit assignments, view grades, view people, view pages, view the syllabus, view quizzes, view the calendar, etc. Enabling Student View creates a Test Student in your course. You can also activate Student View in your Course Settings.

To access Student View through your course home page, find Student View on the right:

student view in canvas

You can now view the course as a student user would see it. For example, students cannot see the Settings navigation link like instructors can.

You will know if you are in Student View because of the persistent box on the bottom of the screen indicating you are logged into Student View.

Click Leave Student View to return to your instructor view:

Leave Student View Button

Course Navigation

As an instructor, you can control which links appear to your students in your course menu. Canvas includes a set of default Course Navigation links that cannot be renamed.

All menu items with this icon:

Canvas menu icon: Eye with line

CANNOT be seen by students. To enable links for students, follow these steps:

Click on Settings at the bottom of your Course Menu:

Canvas course menu; arrow pointing to Settings

Find the Course Navigation tab:

course navigation tab

From the Navigation Page, you can re-order menu items using the drag-and-drop interface.

You can also “enable” a menu item, by clicking on the “kebab” (three dots) associated with the menu item and choosing “enable” –

the "kebab" icon with the Enable option highlighted

Be sure to click “Save” at the bottom of the page to save your changes.

NOTE: Some navigation areas, such as Announcements, can be enabled, but show the “hidden” icon when there is no content. Adding content will enable students to see the menu item.

Moderating Quizzes in Canvas

One question that we are anticipating coming up as we move to Canvas, is how to “moderate” student quizzes. Often, faculty need to give students “special” access to quizzes for a variety of reasons.

Examples of “special access”:

Student needs an extra attempt
Student needs extra time

To “Moderate” a quiz in Canvas:

1. Go into your Canvas course and select “Quizzes” from the navigation bar.

2. Locate the quiz you wish to “moderate” and select the name of it.

3. This will take you to the information for that quiz. Locate the “Moderate This Quiz” button in the upper right and select it.

moderate this quiz

4. This will take you the “Moderate Quiz” screen. You will have a list of all of your students and the following information will be provided.

  • Name of Student
  • Number of attempts available
  • Time it took student to take quiz
  • Number of attempts left
  • Score
  • Edit/Moderate pencil icon

To give your student extra time and/or an extra attempt, select the “pencil” icon.

pencil icon

5. A dialogue box will appear where you can give this student:

  • Extra Attempts
  • Extra Time on Every Attempt

If the quiz is locked, choose to” Manually unlock the quiz for the next attempt.”

Quiz extensions

Please note: When adding extra time for a student, include only the additional time they should have in completing the test.

How to Use the Canvas Dashboard

The dashboard is the first thing you will see when you log into Canvas. It helps you see what is happening in all your current courses, and it gives access to unpublished courses that have not started yet. If you have not favorited any courses, by default the dashboard will automatically display up to 20 courses alphabetically. Any courses you have with an instructor role will be listed first, followed by TA or course designer roles. Your courses with student roles are listed last.

When a term closes on Canvas, those courses will automatically disappear from your dashboard – but you can still access them from the blue Global Navigation menu on the left-hand side of Canvas.

To access all of your Canvas courses, including those from past semesters, click the “Courses” link in the Global Navigation menu, and then click “All Courses.” In this view, you may choose certain courses as favorites by clicking on each star next to the course name. If you favorite certain courses, only those courses will appear on the dashboard.

How to Contact Your Students Before the Semester Begins

With all the uncertainty that we all have for this Fall, our students definitely feel these stresses. One way that we can reduce this uncertainty is by contacting our students early to let them know what we are planning for our Fall classes. This includes whether or not there will be face-to-face sessions planned and/or synchronous online sessions via Zoom and dates/times if you have them already.

Even though our Canvas courses aren’t populated yet, you can get a list of student emails from Enterprise following the instructions below and contact them before they are added to your Canvas course. Students will be populated into Canvas on August 17. After this you can message them directly through Canvas. (More on this topic can be found in the COLRS Teaching Blog)

Instructions to access students enrolled in courses using Self-service (Enterprise): 

1. Go to the Enterprise Self-Service system. (https://apps.uillinois.edu/selfservice/ )

2 Click on UIS.

3. Login with your UIS NetID and Password. 

4. Click on the Faculty & Advisor Services tab across the top of the page.

5. Click on the Faculty Services link.

6. Click on Class List – Summary to view your class roster in a condensed format. 

7. Click “Display E-mail Addresses” at the bottom of the page.

Blended Learning Resources

Blended Learning Toolkit from UCF

Blended Content and Assignments

Blended Interactions

Blended Course Implementation Checklist

Evaluation Framework for Blended Learning Courses

Implementation of a Blended Course

Evaluating Blended Learning: Bringing the Elements Together

EdX: Syllabus and Class Structure Guide for Blended Learning

Blended Learning Innovations: 10 Major Trends

iNACOL Blended Learning Teacher Competency Framework

HyFlex Model Resources

HyFlex Option for Instruction if Campuses Open This Fall

7 Things You Should Know About the HyFlex Course Model

Development Opportunities for Online, Blended & Remote Teaching

As you take a moment to reflect on your experiences teaching during the Spring 2020 semester, COLRS encourages faculty to discuss your teaching experiences and further develop your skills in teaching in an online or blended environment. Upcoming opportunities include: 

COLRS Workshops

Throughout the summer, COLRS will be offering workshops on Technology Tools for Remote Delivery, Blended Learning Best Practices, and HyFlex Teaching. Check the COLRS Workshop calendar for dates and Zoom connection links. These workshops are free and available to all UIS faculty and staff (full or part-time). 

Self-Paced Options

COLRS Building Digital Community Course on CanvasThis self-paced faculty development course meets the requirements of the Higher Learning Commission for required faculty training in online instruction​.  It consists of six modules: Foundations of Online Learning, Accessibility, Instructional Design, Learning Theories, Facilitating Online Learning, Putting it Together. This course is free and available to all UIS faculty and staff (full or part-time). COLRS Canvas Migration Resources on CanvasThis Canvas site is a central location for support, materials, and resources to help you migrate your course to Canvas.​ These resources are publicly available.

Illinois Online Network (ION) Course Options

ION offers several non-credit courses including Overview of Online Courses, Blended Learning Design & Instruction, Instructional Design, Student Assessment, and many more. See the ION schedule​ for all upcoming course offerings. These courses are free for UIS faculty and staff (use code DV412 during registration). 

For-Credit Course Offerings

UIS offers relevant for-credit courses.​ Please contact Human Resources for tuition reimbursement possibilities. 

EDL 515 – Online Teaching and Learning. ​This course will introduce students to online and blended teaching and learning. Major concepts and issues, research in the field, and emerging technologies are covered, as well as practical strategies for designing and teaching online, which students actually get to practice in the course.

EDL 555 – Foundation for Technology in the Curriculum​Basic technology skills and knowledge necessary for today’s education professionals. Computer operation, electronic communication, and computer applications with emphasis on the tools most applicable to the classroom setting. 

The Teacher-Scholar: Interdisciplinary Research on Remote Teaching

​​As emphasized as a value in the UIS Strategic Compass, the UIS community seeks to understand the world around us through the pursuit of scholarship that is challenging and significant.  In the past couple of weeks, COLRS has been approached by UIS faculty who would like to discuss research possibilities relating to the campus-wide transition to remote teaching. If you are interested in participating in an initial discussion ab​out potential project ideas, please e-mail colrs@uis.edu. In your e-mail, please share any immediate areas of interest that you would like to raise in the discussion. COLRS will coordinate the scheduling of a Zoom session in the upcoming weeks for those who show an interest.

Dealing with Slow Internet

As millions of people around the world shift to working from home, the unprecedented transformation of our behavior has put a large strain on internet infrastructure which can lead to slow internet speeds.

Here are some ideas to help us address this challenge:

The following companies are offering free or low-cost internet service during the crisis:

  1. Comcast, Charter, Cox, Google Fiber, Spring, Verizon, and T-Mobile will not disconnect anyone for the next 60 days. They participated in the “Keep Americans Connected” Pledge.
  2. Comcast is offering an Internet Essentials package for free for 60 days during the coronavirus outbreak.
  3. Charter Communication announced it will offer free Spectrum broadband and Wi-Fi access for 60 days to households with K-12 and/or college students who do not already have a subscription. 

Those using Zoom web conferencing to connect with students, may find that Zoom uses significant bandwidth, especially for video calls. To address this concern:

  1. You and your students can connect to a Zoom meeting via telephone.
  2. You may choose to mute audio when not speaking and ask your students to do the same.
  3. You may choose to turn off your webcam unless necessary.
  4. Zoom has offered a set of instructions for those experiencing WIFI connection issues.
  5. Upload your Zoom recordings and other lectures to Kaltura or YouTube, rather than Box, for ease of streaming over slower connections.

Discipline-Specific Resources for Teaching Remotely

In response to COVID-19, the larger educational community has been active in curating virtual resources for educators needing to quickly convert on-ground courses to alternative formats. As COLRS discovers resources that may be useful, we will share them here in this blog post.

Humanities

Digital Humanities from MLA

Multiple Disciplines

Merlot Materials (can be filtered by discipline)

Math

Interactive Simulations for Science and Math

Sciences

A spreadsheet of online resources organized by science subject (curated at large)

Merlot Collection of Virtual Labs

A link to a document of online animations, videos, simulations, & demos (curated by Chemistry Professor at the University of Miami Ohio)

LabXchange Foundational Concepts and Techniques in Biotechnology

Interactive Simulations for Science and Math

Online Lab Toolkit (Office of Digital Learning at Penn State University)

Theatre

Digital Theatre+ Access Resources for Remote Learning

Teaching Theatre Online: A Shift in Pedagogy Amidst Coronavirus Outbreak

L.A. Theatre Works Offering 25 Audio Recordings of Stage Plays for Educators

Tips for Connecting to Campus

If you’re traveling out of town, or just need to connect to campus from home, we have some tips for keeping connected with ease. 

  1. Download and install the UIS VPN client from vpn.uis.edu.
    The university Virtual Private Network (VPN) is free for anyone with a NetID and enables individuals to secure their Internet connection back to the university while using public Wi-Fi such as coffee shops or at conferences. By using the VPN, you are securing yourself from misconfigurations on these public networks and malicious behavior by others on that same wireless network.
  2. Once you install VPN, be sure to set up your on-campus computer for remote access, too!
  3. Move the files you’re working on to Box for easy access from any location. Download Box Sync to make the process quick and easy. 

For additional help with the VPN client, remote desktop access, or Box, contact ITS.

How to Add Files to a Content Area in Blackboard

Files can be uploaded from a local drive or the course itself, and can be documents, spreadsheets, Powerpoints, etc.

  1. Choose the Course Area to which you would like to add a file and click on it. (For example, Course Materials.)
  2. Click Build Content.
  3. Choose Item from the drop down menu.
  4. Enter a name for the file and and explanatory text as desired.
  5. Under Attachments, click Browse in order to attach a file.
  6. Once the file is selected, you will see it listed under Attached files. You can add additional documents by clicking on Browse for more items.
  7. Select the Options as desired:
    • Select Permit Users to View this Content if you want students to see the file immediately once it is uploaded.
    • Optionally select dates and times the document will appear to students.
  8. Click Submit.

The benefits of making content accessible for UDL and UX

I have a wonderful team of student workers who do remediation of documents and video captioning. Recently two examples of their angst as students, highlighted the benefits of thinking about user experience and universal design for learning by making content accessible.

One of my students has a second job, and at that job she is allowed to quietly do online homework. This means she can watch captioned videos only. For one class, she was required to watch around 20 hours of video, however it didn’t have captions, not even auto generated captions. For a student who has personally captioned several hundred hours of video, she was more than a little upset with her professor. She is just trying to make the most of her time, and do her assignments, not having captions impeded that.

Another student, sent me a message the other day that she could not highlight some text in a pdf to copy to her notes. She’s working on a paper and thought a few sentences from the required reading really nailed the point. I knew that the pdf had not had any accessibility work done, so I told her to download it, go through the first few steps of making it accessible, and then copy the required quote, which worked.

In both these cases the students don’t need the files to be accessible because they have a a physical, learning or cognitive disability. They are used to files working a certain way because they do this work at least 20 hours a week, and they are busy people. In their attempts to do their real work, as students, they were inhibited from learning. Yes, accessibility certainly benefits students who may have a hearing or visual impairment. However, if we make content accessible, universally design our classes for all learners, and think about the user experience it will benefit all our students.

Script it and forget it.

This is my 37th blog post, and my 8th on videos. I have talked about evidence based video lengths, correcting captions on YouTube videos you don’t control, audio descriptions, captioning, and getting a clean transcript from a caption file. Today I’d like to write about how to improve the overall quality of a video, and the answer is scripting.

I have worked on, and sat through many videos which are, to a certain extent, improv. This means that the creator sat down cold, and began recording all in one sitting. The video portion could have a talking head, or a PowerPoint, a screen recording, a drawing, or even show some sort of event or chemical reaction. In a video like this there could be a lot of filler words like um, ah, ok, a… Or perhaps there are interjections based on occurrences during the recording such as running out of ink, trying to find the proper tab for a function in the software, or yelling at someone in the house that the laundry is upstairs. For the student this can be distracting. And for those of us who don’t like hearing our own voices in a recording, it can make us cringe even more to hear, in our own voice, “someone let the dog out, um ah, where was I?”

An effective way to decrease these instances is to write a script for the video. Take the time to write down what you plan to say. Edit it a few times. And then read the script during the recording. Depending on your setup, you may want to print it out or have it displayed on an extra monitor. I recommend increasing the font size so it is easier to read as well. Doing this will decrease the ums, ahs, and oks. It cannot prevent a barking dog, but it can allow you to scrap the recording with the barking dog, and not worry about where you were to say what you meant to say. It will also give you an initial transcript of the video. Depending on how you are captioning your videos, you might also be able to upload the transcript and allow your video hosting platform to sync it.

View Your Class List

The official system of record for your class list is the Enterprise Self-Service system. This is also the system where students register and drop courses and instructors enter midterm and final grades.

To Enter Grades in the Enterprise system:

  1. Go to the Enterprise Self-Service system.
  2. Click on UIS.
  3. Login with your UIS NetID and Password. This is the same information that you use to log into UIS Webmail.
  4. Click on the Faculty & Advisor Services tab across the top of the page.
  5. Then click on the Faculty Services link.
  6. Click on Class List – Summary to view your class roster in a condensed format.
  7. Select the desired Term from the drop down menu and click Submit.
  8. Select the desired CRN (course reference number) from the drop down menu and click Submit.
  9. To view a class list for another section that you are teaching, click on Select a Term & CRN or Select a CRN from the bottom of the page.

How to add an .srt captions file to media in Blackboard

To upload an .srt file in Blackboard, goto My Media.  Next to the video you would like to add captions to, click the greyed out pencil highlighted below with the red arrow.

Screenshot of My Media showing greyed pen to click to edit media

You will then be on a screen with 9 options below your video, one of them is captions.  Click captions

screenshot showing details through replace video in media edit screen

You will now see a blue button on the far left, “upload caption file”, click it.

screenshot showing upload captions button

Then a new box will pop up.  Browse for the file.  Select the language.  And give it a label.  If the language is English, “English” would be a good label.  Then click save.

screenshot showing upload a captions file

The digital world isn’t full of color for everyone

Recently I saw a post on Facebook with a blue circle, with a barely lighter blue rhino in it.  It equated intelligence with the ability to see the rhino.  It made me think of the need to keep color in mind in our instructional materials.  Around 8% of men and 1% of women of Northern European descent are color blind.  And the older we get the more difficulty we all have with certain color combinations.  So it is important to think about this for our students, if you like to use color in your documents or presentations.  Below are some known color combinations which are highly problematic.

  • Green & Red
  • Green & Brown
  • Blue & Purple
  • Green & Blue
  • Light Green & Yellow
  • Blue & Grey
  • Green & Grey
  • Green & Black

This website by Giacomo Mazzocato or by WebAIM can give you an online color checking tool.  The Paciello Group Website has a downloadable piece of software for Mac and PC which you might also find useful. If you use lots of color, please check the contrast.

Employability Skills Rubrics

If you’ve been trying to identify employability skills’ rubrics, check out the resources below.

  • Association of American Colleges and Universities  VALUE Rubrics  – Consists of the following sixteen rubrics:
    • Intellectual and Practical Skills:  inquiry and analysis, critical thinking, creative thinking, written communication, oral communication, reading, quantitative literacy, information literacy, teamwork, and problem-solving
    • Personal and Social Responsibility:  civic engagement, intercultural knowledge and competence, ethical reasoning, foundations and skills for lifelong learning, global learning
    • Integrative and Applied Learning: integrative learning
  • Emerging EdTech 21st Century Assessments Rubric -By creating assignments that earn high scores on this rubric, you can provide opportunities for students to develop and master the skills that are increasingly necessary to excel in today’s increasingly digital world while demonstrating acquisition of the required outcomes in many different types of courses.  Criteria categories include:
    • choice, flexibility, writing required, inquiry-based learning, real-world connection, collaboration, digital literacy, entrepreneurial skills, and mastery learning.
  • ConnectEd Studios Rubrics Bank – You’ll need to establish a free account to access the rubrics bank.  Sample rubrics you might be interested in include teamwork, group skills, and digital communication to name a few.

Promoting Learner Professionalism

The Leadership Development Center at York College conducted a national professionalism study, which identified key professionalism components spanning across industries and occupations.  In the 2015 report, respondents ranked seven responsible parties according to how responsible they felt each should be in developing professionalism in college graduates.  Students themselves were ranked number one and were followed by faculty ranking number two.  The report also describes the qualities of professionalism and unprofessionalism.   This list of qualities could be used for developing learner expectations for your course and allow various opportunities for practice in adopting professional attitudes and behaviors prior to graduation.  Adapt ideas from this learning activity to help your learners improve in professionalism behavior and attitudes.

Image of a bar graph ranking responsible parties for developing professionalism in college. The ranking for most responsible is students themselves, faculty, Career Development office, Parents, Employers, Other College Offices, Alumni.

Leadership Development Center, 2015 National Professionalism Study

The National Career Clusters Framework

The National Career Clusters Framework consists of 16 Career Clusters, represents more than 79 Career Pathways, and includes knowledge and skills statements.  Use the framework as an organizing tool for comprehensive understanding and to guide curriculum design with the purpose of bridging secondary and postsecondary curriculum.  A new proposed sustainability/green category is also available with Green/Sustainability Knowledge and Skill Statements and tools and references to aid in the instruction of the Green and Sustainability Standards.   As a reminder, Career Ready Practices should be applied throughout the continuum of learning.

The Illinois Career Clusters, Pathways and Programs of Study complements The National Career Clusters Framework and serves as a resource in understanding Illinois’ adoption of the National Career Cluster Framework.

Image of the Illinois Career Clusters Framework outlining the five CTE secondary areas, 16 career clusters and 79 career pathways.

Illinois Career Clusters Framework

ACT WorkKeys Competencies

Explore the ACT WorkKeys Assessment information developed to measure foundational hard and soft skills relevant to any occupation, at any level, and across industries.  Each assessment has characteristics and skills divided into seven levels of difficulty.  Use the information to explore ideas for developing or enhancing learning activities.

Relevant Categories:

  • Graphic Literacy – Use charts, graphs and diagrams for identifying what information is being presented and understanding how to use it.
  • Workplace Documents – Be creative and incorporate readings that reflect real workplace documents.  Learners can gather information from the documents to make job-related decisions and solve problems. Sample documents can include messages, emails, letters, directions, signs, bulletins, policies, websites, contracts, and regulations.
  • Business Writing – Assess learning activities in the context of workplace writing needs.  Content needs to be clear and free of distractions such as poor grammar, misspellings, and extraneous information. Explain to learners how careless errors may lead the reader (e.g. customer, supervisor etc.) to believe other errors may exist in terms of facts, resulting in the writer (or employee) losing credibility and trustworthiness.
  • Workplace Observation – Provide opportunities for learners to observe, follow, understand, and evaluate processes, demonstrations, and other workplace procedures.
  • Fit – Help learners identify interests and values compatible with a work environment conducive for job success.  
  • Talent – Develop activities to increase awareness of a student’s attitude or behavior, that if demonstrated in the workplace, could lead to disciplinary action or termination.  Provide opportunities for growth and feedback.

Degree Qualifications Profile

The Degree Qualifications Profile (DQP) outlines a set of reference points for what students should know and be able to do upon completion of an associate, bachelor’s and master’s degrees – in any field of study. The are five broad, interrelated categories of proficiencies which provide a profile of what degrees mean in terms of specific learning outcomes.

The DQP’s five categories of learning:

Image of the Degree Qualifications Profile outlining the Associate Bachelor's and Master's degree levels and the caregories of learning including specialized knowledge, broad and integrative knowledge, intellectual skills, applied and collaborative learning and civic and global learning.

  1. Specialized Knowledge
  2. Broad and Integrative Knowledge
  3. Intellectual Skills (analytic inquiry, use of information resources, engaging diverse perspectives, ethical reasoning, quantitative fluency and communicative fluency)
  4. Applied and Collaborative Learning
  5. Civic and Global Learning
Supplemental Resources:
  • Resource Kit (e.g. integrated learning frameworks, course-embedded assignments, assessment, rubrics, capstone portfolios etc.)
  • Assignment Library (browse and adapt assignments to your needs)
  • Implementation Resources
    • Tuning Impact Study: Developing Faculty Consensus to Strengthen Student Learning
    • Roadmap to Enhanced Student Learning, Implementing the DQP and Tuning
    • Tuning: A Guide for Creating Discipline Specific Frameworks to Foster Meaningful Change
    • DQP Impact Study: Framing and Connecting Initiatives to Strengthen Student Learning
    • Using the Degree Qualifications Profile
    • And more

 

NC-NET Employability Skills Resource Toolkit

The North Carolina Network for Excellence in Teaching developed an Employability Skills Resource Toolkit comprised of eight modules for faculty to use for integrating employability skills across the curriculum.  Use the modules to introduce a topic or adapt for course-specific content. Each module contains instructional materials with course lessons and learning objectives, questions for reflection and discussion, student handouts, assessment rubrics, facilitator notes and annotated presentation slides.

Module Topics:

  1. Interpersonal Skills and Teamwork
  2. Communications
  3. Integrity and Professionalism
  4. Problem Solving and Decision Making
  5. Initiative and Dependability
  6. Information Processing
  7. Adaptability and Lifelong Learning
  8. Entrepreneurship

The Rigor Relevance Framework

The Rigor Relevance Framework was developed by the International Center for Leadership in Education to examine curriculum, instruction, and assessment along the two dimensions of higher standards and student achievement.  The tool can be used for both instruction and assessment.

  • The Knowledge Taxonomy (y-axis) based on Bloom’s Taxonomy
    • Six level – thinking continuum
  • Application Model  (x-axis), developed by Bill Daggett
    • Five level –  knowledge continuum
    • Includes using knowledge to solve complex, real-world problems and create projects, designs, and other works for use in real-world situations.
  • Supplemental Resource: Handbook with Instructional Activities Checklist

Image of the Rigor Relevance Framework with y-axis prepresenting the Knowledge Taxonomy based on Bloom's Taxonomy and the x-axis representing Bill Daggett's Application Model.

The Rigor Relevance Framework, International Center for Leadership in Education

About Unavailable Tests and Surveys

You manage availability to students when a test or survey is deployed on in a content area of your course (e.g., Course Materials or Assignments), by click on the “item options” button Blackboard editi item button on the Test Options or Survey Options page.

Unavailable and deleted tests and surveys differ in the following ways:

  • Unavailable tests and surveys deployed in a content area do not appear to students. When Edit Mode is ON, instructors and course builders can see unavailable tests.
    • You can limit test and survey availability to a specific time period with the Display After and Display Until dates and times. If the link to a test or survey is available, but neither date is set, it is immediately and always available.
  • If you delete a test or survey from a content area in your course, it is removed from that location. You can deploy it again as needed. You can deploy each test and survey in one location only.
  • If you delete a test or survey from the tests or surveys tool pages, it is permanently deleted from your course. This is irreversible. You can access the tests and surveys tools in the Course Tools section of the Control Panel.

Recommended Software Applications and Plug-ins

Software Applications & Plug-ins

Use the links below to obtain and install any plug-ins or viewers needed for your courses. When you download software, be sure to obtain the latest (final) version.

Software Available to UIS Students

Information Technology Services provides many instructional software applications and digital resources for UIS students free of charge. For instance, Microsoft Office 365 is availalbe to UIS students for FREE.

In addition, UIS students may purchase reduced price software through the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Software WebStore offers discounted software to UIS faculty, students, and staff, including anti-virus, Microsoft Office, Adobe Creative Suite, WinZip, and more.

Web Browsers

Screen Reading Software

Natural Reader
A free screen reading software that allows you to listen to any text on your PC.

Audio and Media Players

File Compression

Winzip

File Readers and Viewers

Adobe Acrobat Reader

Accessing Moodle at UIS

UIS maintains an instance of Moodle for faculty and staff use at https://uistraining1.uis.edu/login/index.php

If you have a UIS NetID, you may access the Moodle site by click on the “Continue” button on the right side of the Moodle home page.

If you are a guest user of the Moodle system, your UIS contact will send you instructions for accessing the site.