Online Teaching & Technology Blog

Center for Online Learning, Research and Service @ Illinois Springfield

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Assess and Tweak at the Midpoint: Tips for Teaching Online

In this workshop, learn our top tips for assessing and tweaking your online course at the midpoint of the semester, as well as the process for online proctored exams and more.

Midpoint Course Checklist

50 classroom assessment techniques

Starting the Semester: Tips for Teaching Online

In this workshop, learn our top tips for starting the semester in an online course. Later this term, we’ll offer tips on the midpoint and concluding your online courses.

Checklist for Starting the Semester in your online course

 

 

 

What is the TEACH Act?

The Technology, Education, and Copyright Harmonization Act (TEACH Act) of 2002 is an amendment to the Copyright Act of 1976 that addresses online education. It is sometimes referred to as Section 110(2) of the copyright law.

TEACH Act resources:

What is fair use?

Fair use is the right of the public to reproduce portions of a copyrighted work without permission for purposes such as scholarly criticism, parody, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research.

Fair use resources:

  • Section 107 of the Copyright Act – lists the four factors that courts use when determining whether a use of a copyrighted work is fair use
  • An explanation of fair use and a checklist by Columbia University Libraries/Information Services

What is the public domain?

Public domain works have expired copyrights or were never protected by copyright law. You do not need permission to use or copy public domain works. Examples include U.S. government works, laws, and work published in the U.S. prior to 1923.

Public domain resources:

What is Creative Commons?

Creative Commons (CC) licenses help creators of content retain copyright while allowing others to copy, distribute, and make some uses of their work. Creative Commons licensing works with copyright, not in place of it, when you want to grant certain rights in your copyrighted work. All CC licenses require users to attribute the original creator of a work.

Creative Commons resources:

  • Watch a video to learn more about CC licenses
  • See creativecommons.org to learn more, use a license-choosing tool for your own work, or search for creative commons work

Content provided by Blackboard.

What is Copyright?

The United States government states “Copyright is a form of protection grounded in the U.S. Constitution and granted by law for original works of authorship fixed in a tangible medium of expression. Copyright covers both published and unpublished works.” Source: Copyright in General by www.copyright.gov.

Copyright law resources:

Content provided by Blackboard.

10 Tips for Creating Accessible Online Course Content

In our media-centric society, the desire and need for online learning is at an all-time high. However, as more academic content goes online, the industry is running into a stumbling block as they struggle to make their online courses accessible. With recent lawsuits in higher education and updates to Section 508 on the horizon, it is more important than ever that online learning content be made accessible to students with disabilities.

In this webinar, Janet Sylvia, Web Accessibility Group Leader and Web Accessibility Trainer, will provide you with 10 tips for making your online course material accessible.

Janet will cover:

  • The challenges of making online course content accessible
  • The legal landscape for online learning and accessibility
  • Challenges and solutions for instructors and administrators
  • Developing an accessibility statement and accessibility policies
  • 10 tips for creating accessible course content

Presenters

Janet Sylvia
Web Accessibility Trainer

Sponsored by: 3 Play Media

Download 10 Tips Handout (PDF)

Doing the Right Thing: A Focus on Accessibility in Online Programs

In today’s world of online learning, high quality course development and delivery are key components for successful online programs. Institutions follow a myriad of instructional design strategies, faculty development techniques, and student engagement activities. But in the midst of these important elements, there is one thing that is sometimes overlooked – or completely left out: Accessibility. Title 5 (which defines distance education) of the ADA makes it clear that online classes must fulfill the requirements of the Americans with Disability Act and section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

As leaders in online education, accessible design is an important component of your online program strategy and execution. Join this webinar as we discuss techniques to drive consistent compliance with Title 5 as you build out new and update existing online programs.

Presenters:

  • Darcy Hardy, Associate Vice President, Enterprise Consulting, Blackboard
  • Scott Ready, Director for Customer Relations, Enterprise Consulting, Blackboard

Online Video and the ADA: How a Landmark Case Changed the Legal Landscape of Closed Captioning

 

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was signed into law in 1990, before the Internet was an integral part of society. While it originally dictated accessibility requirements for physical structures and businesses, several recent legal cases have expanded the reach of the ADA to include places of online accommodation. MIT, Harvard, and Netflix (among others) have all been sued for not providing closed captioning for their online video content.

This webinar will be presented by Arlene B. Mayerson, the Directing Attorney of the Disability Rights Education & Defense Fund (DREDF). Ms. Mayerson led the legal team that secured a historic settlement regarding application of the ADA to online commerce in National Association of the Deaf (NAD), et al. v. Netflix, which ensures 100% closed captions in Netflix’s On-Demand Streaming Content. In this webinar, she will discuss how she and the NAD brought Netflix under the ADA, as well as how the ruling has impacted the legal landscape of web accessibility and closed captioning.

This webinar will cover:

  • What constitutes a place of public accommodation under the ADA
  • How Netflix was originally brought under the ADA
  • How the scope of the ADA has changed since the Netflix ruling
  • The current legal landscape of closed captioning and web accessibility
  • How the Netflix ruling impacts online education and other industries using streaming video
  • Given recent lawsuits, who is implicated by the ADA?

About Arlene B. Mayerson
Arlene B. Mayerson is one of the nation’s leading experts in disability rights law. She has been a key advisor to both Congress and the disability community on the major disability rights legislation for the past two decades. At the request of members of Congress, Ms. Mayerson supplied expert testimony before several committees of Congress when they were debating the ADA. She filed comments on the ADA regulations for more than 500 disability rights organizations. Ms. Mayerson has devoted her career exclusively to disability rights practice, representing clients in a wide array of issues. She has provided representation, consultation to counsel, and coordination of amicus briefs on key disability rights cases before the U.S. Supreme Court. She was appointed by the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Education to the Civil Rights Reviewing Authority, responsible for reviewing civil rights decisions of the Department.

Ms. Mayerson is also a John and Elizabeth Boalt Lecturer in disability law at Berkeley Law, University of California, Berkeley (Boalt Hall). She has published many articles on disability rights and is the author of a comprehensive three-volume treatise on the ADA: Americans with Disabilities Act Annotated-Legislative History, Regulations & Commentary (Clark Boardman Callaghan, 1994), which sets forth the legislative history and regulations for each provision of the ADA.

Presenters

Arlene B. Mayerson
Directing Attorney | Disability Rights Education & Defense Fund

Lily Bond (Moderator)
Marketing Manager | 3Play Media

Sponsored by 3 Play Media

UIS Disability Statement for Syllabus

As of Fall 2015, the following disability statement should be used on UIS syllabi:

If you are a student with a documented temporary or ongoing disability in need of academic accommodations, please contact the Office of Disability Services at 217-206-6666.

Disabilities may include, but are not limited to: Psychological, Health, Learning, Sensory, Mobility, ADHD, TBI and Asperger’s syndrome.  In some cases, accommodations are also available for shorter term disabling conditions such as severe medical situations.  Accommodations are based upon underlying medical and cognitive conditions and may include, but are not limited to: extended time for tests and quizzes, distraction free environment for tests and quizzes, a note taker, interpreter and FM devices.

Students who have made a request for an academic accommodation that has been reviewed and approved by the ODS will receive an accommodation letter which should be provided by the student to the instructor as soon as possible, preferably in the first week of class.

For assistance in seeking academic accommodations, please contact the UIS Office of Disability Services (ODS) in the Human Resources Building, Room 80, phone number 217-206-6666.

Effective Online Teaching Practices

Technology is secondary.

COLRS Teaching and Technology blog: http://blogs.uis.edu/colrs/

UIS Information Technology Services: http://www.uis.edu/informationtechnologyservices/

Communication is key.

Keep students informed.

Be clear.

Syllabus is the center of your course.

Course Calendar – Keep dates in one location.

Make your course materials accessible.

Be present.

Discussion Board

Writing discussion questions.

CREST+ Model: Writing Effective Online Discussion Questions

UW Oshkosh Discussion Tips and Pointers

Announcements

Email

Be consistent.

Create a consistent day and time for deadlines.

Create a consistent format for your course.

Give feedback within established parameters.

Ask for and provide feedback.

Rubrics

Rubric Evaluation Reports

Two Sample Blackboard Rubrics

Blackboard Rubrics Workshop

Grading Rubrics in Blackboard written info

Graded Assignments Workshop Recording

Turnitin Assignment

Discussion Grader

Announcements

NetID-Authenticated anonymous feedback tool

 

Specifics for UIS

Check roster in Faculty Self Service. Blackboard is not the system of record.

Enter Grades in Faculty Self-Service

End-of-course Evaluations

Strategies for increasing response rates

Evaluations at UIS

Student -drop emails from ITS – Hiding and Removing Students from your course

Disability Services

Stay informed.

Faculty Focus is an excellent resource to locate the latest trends in online education. See recent articles and sign-up for email or RSS updates when new articles are posted.

University of Central Florida’s Teaching Online Pedagogical Repository

 

UIS Blackboard Archive Policy

As an ongoing effort to ensure that Blackboard runs as quickly and as efficiently as possible, a Blackboard Archival Policy will go into effect July 1, 2015.

The Blackboard subcommittee (comprised of representatives from ITS, COLRS, and online coordinators) researched practices of other universities, consulted with the Registrar, and proposed a recommendation to the Academic Technology Committee as well as the Campus Senate. Both groups endorsed the policy.

Courses will be retained on Blackboard for 3 years, on a single server (http://bb.uis.edu), after which they will be purged. As of Fall 2015, the courses available in Blackboard will be Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Summer 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Summer 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015, and Summer 2015. All older courses will be purged.

Moving forward, each semester the oldest courses will be deleted from Blackboard, keeping the course load at 3 years. Faculty will receive a reminder prior to the deletion.

Please be aware that there are options for retaining course content longer than three years. Instructions for each option are linked below.

  • Use Blackboard’s built-in tool for archiving courses
    • The Export/Archive Course tool creates a zip file that contains all the content for the course.
    • Save the .zip file to your UIS Box.com or Google Drive storage space
    • The zip file can be then be re-imported into Blackboard at a later time, if needed
  • Request a GOLD course from COLRS
    • Many faculty already take advantage of GOLD courses, which serve as a template. GOLD courses are not taught from; they are merely a course shell where faculty can keep updated content that can easily be copied to live course as needed.

Read the policy approved by the Academic Technology Committee and the Campus Senate. If you have any questions, please contact COLRS at colrs@uis.edu or Kara McElwrath at kmcel2@uis.edu.

Quickly access this post with http://go.uis.edu/bbarchive

How to create a Google Site for your online class, a presentation, an e-portfolio, and more

Because ITS subscribes to Google Apps, we have a plethora of free Google tools at our disposal that we can use to enhance online education and research. The best part is that everyone with a UIS NetID has access to all that Google has to offer, without having to register for a new account! One of these tools is Google Sites.

There are a variety of ways that you can use Google Sites right now in your online classes, or for professional development or research purposes: You can use Google Sites to create an e-portfolio, to showcase your CV, or even as a more accessible alternative to PowerPoint.

To get started, just sign in to Google Apps for Education:

Click Login.

  • Sign in with your regular NetID and password.
  • Next, click the Apps button at the top of your screen, to the left of your email address. Select Sites.

Click the Apps button, and then select Sites.

  • Click Create.

Click Create.

 

  • You will now be directed to a page where you will be able to choose different details about your site. First, you may choose a template for your site based on its purpose. To view more templates, choose “Browse the gallery for more,” which will give you the option to choose the best template for your site.
    Note: For faculty completing online professional development through COLRS, search for “Online Faculty Development ePortfolio.” Select this as your template.

    Or choose “Blank template” to start a site from scratch.
  • After selecting a template, you will name your site and complete the URL at which your site will be located.
  • There are also two optional menus that can be expanded: Click on “Select a theme” to choose a color scheme for your site, and click on “More options” to enter site categories and a short description of your site. Most people do not change anything here and leave them blank.
  • Once you are done choosing your template, naming your site, and typing a short URL, click Create at the top of the page.

Screenshot4

  •  You will now be at the homepage of your site!

What to do next

You are now ready to begin adding content, including additional pages, images, documents, videos, and more!

Google provides quite a bit of documentation on how to manage your site. Please explore the links below for the most up to date information on how to accomplish various tasks within Google Sites:

We are always available to assist you in brainstorming ideas on how you might implement Google Sites in your courses, or to help you set up a Google Site before a big presentation at a conference. We can also provide guidance with the Online Faculty Development ePortfolio template.

If you need additional tech support, contact ITS at 206-6000, or techsupport@uis.edu.

How to create narrated video lectures in PowerPoint

  • First, open your PowerPoint presentation.
  • Make sure the presentation is saved as a Macro-Enabled PowerPoint Presentation (.pptm)
  • For each slide you wish to narrate:
    1. Go to the slide.
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    2. Click ‘Insert’ -> ‘Media’ -> ‘Audio’ -> ’Record Audio’.
      2

    3. To begin recording, click the record button. It has a red circle.
      3

    4. Read the content for that slide. Make sure to speak into your microphone. 
    5. To stop recording, click the stop button. It has a blue square.
      4

    6. Optional: To test that your recording sounds acceptable, click the play button. It has a green triangle.
      5

    7. Click ‘OK’ when finished to complete the recording for the slide.
      6

    8. Repeat these steps for each slide you wish to narrate.
  • Finally, you can export to video when audio recording has been completed.
    1. Click ‘File’ -> ‘Export’ -> ‘Create a Video’.
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    2. For the video quality, select ‘Computer & HD Displays’ to ensure the highest quality.
      8

    3. For timings and narrations, select ‘Use Recorded Timings and Narrations’ to ensure your recordings are included in the video.
      9

    4. Optional: If you have slides without narration, you can adjust the default duration of 5 seconds for these slides.
      10

    5. Click ‘Create Video’. You can name your video and select where to save it.
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Now that you’ve created your video, follow these instructions to upload the video to Kalutra through Blackboard.

Emerging Technologies for Education

On February 17, the COLRS Staff offered a presentation titled “Emerging Technologies for Education” through the UIS Faculty Development Office. The following is a list of technologies presented along with others that are among the new favorites for online educators.

ACCESSIBILITY

YouTube Auto-Captioning

Even if you haven’t added captions to your video, YouTube may use speech recognition technology to automatically make captions available.
Since these are automatically generated, the quality of the captions may vary from video to video. As the video owner, you can always edit the captions to improve accuracy, or remove them from your video if you do not want them to be available for your viewers.
If your video does not have automatic captions, it could be due to one or more of the following reasons:
• The language in the video is not yet supported by automatic captions
• The video is too long
• The video has poor sound quality or contains speech that YouTube doesn’t recognize
• There is a long period of silence at the beginning of the video
• There are multiple speakers whose speech overlap

Fangs Screen-Reader Emulator

Fangs renders a text version of a web page similar to how a screen reader would read it. The ambition is to help developers understand how an assistive device would present a website and thereby increase chances of finding accessibility issues early.

Watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jd3qfZGGM88

VIDEO/PRESENTATION TECHNOLOGY

Presentme-Edu

Present.me is the fastest and easiest way to add video or audio to your document or presentation, so that who ever is viewing gets the whole story – as if you were in the room with them!

Watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v6HAw1VsvMs

Vialogues

Vialogues (which derives from “video dialogues”) is an award-winning discussion platform that proves that videos are both powerful teaching resources and the ultimate conversation starters. Vialogues provides a space for users to hold meaningful and dynamic time-stamped discussions about videos.

Watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sAKRcmZFcW0

ShowMe

The ShowMe iPad app lets you create lessons using a whiteboard. The app is free and there is no limit what you can teach! Our community has created millions of ShowMes, from chemistry to history to football strategy – and more knowledge is being shared everyday.

Watch: https://vimeo.com/38003641

Swivl

Swivl was founded in 2010 by Brian Lamb and Vladimir Tetelbaum, with the idea of making video a more useful tool with robotics. They launched the first concept to market through crowdfunding on IndieGoGo, and have been engaging with users and improving solutions ever since.  This culminated with the launch of the second generation Swivl and Swivl Cloud in April 2014.

Watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SfQFNfnGWU0

 TOUCH TECHNOLOGY

Leap Motion

The Leap Motion Controller senses how you naturally move your hands and lets you use your computer in a whole new way. Point, wave, reach, grab. Pick something up and move it. Do things you never dreamed possible.

Watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gby6hGZb3ww

PRODUCTIVITY

TodaysMeet

Expand your classroom:  Students can join from home or even from other schools to make the classroom community even bigger.

Embrace the backchannel: The backchannel improves meetings, presentations, Socratic seminars and fishbowls, movies and silent activities, reviews and snow days, and more.

Empower learners:  TodaysMeet gives everyone the floor and lets even the quietest students express themselves.

WorkFlowy

A simple, easy-to-use, cross-platform tool that helps you organize your life.

Watch:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CSmbnaPZVHE

BibMe

BibMe is an automatic citation creator that supports MLA, APA, Chicago, and Turabian formatting. BibMe leverages external databases to quickly fill citation information for you. BibMe will then format the citation information and compile a bibliography according to the guidelines of the style manuals.

Watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8LikOn0xgb0

MOBILE

Flipboard

Flipboard is a social-network aggregation, magazine-format mobile app localized in more than 20 languages. The software collects content from social media and other websites, presents it in magazine format, and allows users to “flip” through their social-networking feeds and feeds from websites that have partnered with the company.

Flipboard is produced by Flipboard, Inc., a United-States-based software company founded in 2010 by Mike McCue and Evan Doll and headquartered in Palo Alto, California.

Watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CgdU8UvwfB4

WhatsApp

WhatsApp Messenger is an instant messaging app for smartphones that operates under a subscription business model. The proprietary, cross-platform app enables users of select feature phones to use the Internet to communicate. In addition to text messaging, WhatsApp can be used to send images, video, and audio media messages. WhatsApp has also started rolling out the much awaited voice calling feature.  Locations can also be shared through the use of integrated mapping features.

Watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mhnFh1MGx4w

Anydo

s a suite of integrated mobile productivity apps. The company’s first product, the Any.do task management app, was launched on Android in November 2011 and later for iPhone and Chrome on June 3, 2012.  

Any.do’s namesake to-do list app was released on November 10, 2011 on the Android platform and TechCrunch reported it to have 500,000 downloads in its first 30 days after launch. It was later released on iOS in June 2012 and reached another milestone with 100,000 iPhone downloads in its first day on the platform.  Any.do includes numerous planning and task management functions:

  • Unlimited, customizable task folders
  • Task sharing and delegation
  • Built-in microphone can be used for voice entry of tasks
  • Auto-suggest feature with predictive text
  • Time- and location-based reminders
  • Cloud sync across all of a user’s devices

Watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gPpHp4Yfs_M

Remind

Remind (formerly Remind101) is a private mobile messaging platform that enables teachers to send Reminders to students and parents via text and email.The platform has over 10 million users and sends over 65 million messages per month. As of February 2014, 15% of the K-12 teacher population in the U.S used Remind101.

Watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-aJNeyHvHZA

File Storage Options at UIS

Where’s the best place to store your class files, research projects, and other important documents?  You have many file storage options, including Box, Google Drive, OneDrive, and Kaltura.  ITS has created a useful matrix comparing the benefits and limits of each data storage service available at UIS.

Additional information can be found on their website.

 

2014 Innovating Pedagogy Report

The annual Innovating Pedagogy report explores new forms of teaching, learning and assessment for an interactive world, to guide teachers and policy makers in productive innovation.

Produced by the Institute of Educational Technology at The Open University, the report identifies ten educational terms, theories and practices that have the potential to provoke major shifts in educational practice in the near future.

Featured in 2014’s annual report:

  1. Massive open social learning
  2. Learning design informed by analytics
  3. Flipped classrooms
  4. Bring your own devices
  5. Learning to learn
  6. Dynamic assessment
  7. Event-based learning
  8. Learning through storytelling
  9. Threshold concepts
  10. Bricolage

The report can be downloaded at: http://www.openuniversity.edu/sites/www.openuniversity.edu/files/The_Open_University_Innovating_Pedagogy_2014_0.pdf

Students Who Are Parents

The Institute for Women’s Policy Research completes research “conducts rigorous research and disseminates its findings to address the needs of women, promote public dialog, and strengthen families, communities, and societies” (source).

In November 2014, IWPR published a fact sheet on college students who are also parents, and over a quart of them are. Read the students who are parents fact sheet

Open Educational Resources – Cable Green

Cable Green, Director of Global Learning at Creative Commons, led a discussion of “eTextbooks and Open Educational Resources” to help University of Illinois Springfield (UIS) student leaders understand the local and global education opportunities when digital content, the internet and open licensing are combined. View the recording of Cable Green’s lecture.Movie Fifty Shades Darker (2017)

Students Checking Discussion Board Grades, Rubric Scores, and Comments

Online students should regularly check their discussion grades with the rubric scores (if the Blackboard rubric tool is used) and comments. For those students who may not know how to do this, here is a brief review:

The student should Go to “My Grades” and find the week’s discussion. For every graded item in Blackboard, the student will see that the title of the graded item is a hyperlink. The student may click on the hyperlink which will open a page showing all his/her contributions to the week’s discussion, plus any comments left by the instructor. The student will also see an icon to the left of the number grade that looks like this:

rubricgrade

If he/she clicks on that grid, a pop up window will open showing the Rubric Detail.

Alternately, the student may go to My Grades, find the week’s discussion and look for the words “View Rubric” –

viewrubric

Clicking there will also open the Rubric Detail page.

When the instructor has written comments in the “Feedback to Students” panel, the student will see a word bubble icon next to his/her grade –

commentbubble

The student may click on the bubble to view the instructor’s comments.

Request Electronic Library Reserves

E-Reserves are a way of placing documents on hold and linking them in your course for your students to observe for a short period of time. These items can supplement your online instruction and can offer your students a plethera of information that can enhance their online learning experience.

Reserve resources and review the Library policies for E-Reserves

Ideas for including E-Reserves in your course include:

  • Streaming media to offer examples of concepts
  • Journal articles used for example and research
  • Case studies for course application and assessment

Submit Final Grades

Both on-campus and online courses have the same deadlines for reporting student grades.

To Enter Grades in Banner:

  1. Go to https://apps.uillinois.edu/selfservice/
  2. Click on UIS.
  3. Login with your UIS NetID/Password.
  4. Click on Faculty & Advisor Services.
  5. Then click Faculty Services.
  6. Click on Final Grade Entry.
  7. Select the desired semester and class.
  8. Enter your grades.
  9. Click Submit to complete the process.

SoftChalk at UIS

SoftChalk is a tool to help enhance text-based lectures. It allows instructors to “chunk” their content into smaller pages, add images, flashcards, graded or self-test quizzes, and more. Learn more about SoftChalk.

Instructors may access SoftChalk using Citrix Virtual Desktop. View instructions for installing and using the Virtual Desktop app.

Import Test Questions to Blackboard with Respondus

Respondus allows instructors to import questions from a text file and upload them to Blackboard courses.

To import questions from a text document to Respondus, instructors must format the text file in a specific (and simple) manner. Learn about the Respondus Question Import Format (pdf).

Once the text document is formatted, upload the questions following these instructions (pdf).

Kaltura Media Overview

Kaltura Media is the video management solution at UIS. Faculty and students may upload video from other sources (MS Lync, camcorders or phones) or record web cam and/or screen capture videos through Kaltura Capture Space Lite. A fantastic feature of Kaltura is the statistics for video use. It will tell you the percentage of your video that each student watch, how many times it was access, and the average view time. Across UIS, the average view time for a video is 7 minutes and 35 seconds, which is on the longer side of the recommended 5-7 minute length for video lectures.

For detailed videos on how to use Kaltura, please see the Kaltura Company’s training videos on Kaltura and Capture Space Lite.

UIS Kaltura Resources

Access and Upload Videos to Kaltura Media

Faculty and students access Kaltura Media through Blackboard.

  1. Go to the “My Blackboard” tab and locate the My Media module on the page. Click on “My Media.”
  2. Click on “Add New” and then select “Media Upload.”
  3. Click “Choose a file to upload” and select your file.
  4. Your video will upload automatically. Depending on the size, this may take a while.
  5. After your video uploads, edit the name, description, tags (key words), and privacy settings.
  6. Click “Save”  to complete the upload process.
  7. Follow the steps in this post to add your video a Blackboard course.

Video Lectures

Beginning in Fall 2014, faculty may reserve time in the COLRS Faculty Video Recording Studio to record lectures or interviews. The room is equipped with a high quality video camera, lighting, microphone, green screen, and a computer for editing videos with Camtasia Studio.

Please contact COLRS to discuss your project.

Using Turnitin as a Student

Turnitin is plagiarism detection software available to faculty at UIS. To learn more about using Turnitin as a student, including helpful videos, please see http://www.uis.edu/colrs/students/turnitin/.

You may also find the Turnitin Manual for Students (pdf) a helpful resource.

 

Submit a Turnitin Assignment for a Student

Whether it is to spot check for suspected plagiarism or submit an assignment for a student with computer problems, instructors may submit a student file to a Turnitin Assignment they have created in their Blackboard course site.

  1. Go to the Blackboard course that contains the Turnitin Assignment.
  2. Go to Control Panel > Course Tools > Turnitin Assignment.
  3. Click on the assignment name.
  4. Select the student’s name from the “Author” drop down list.
  5. Enter a title for the paper.
  6. Click on “Choose from this computer” button to upload the file, and the find and select the student’s paper.
  7. Click the “Upload” button.
  8. Next, you’ll see a preview of the file you submitted. If this is the correct document, click “Submit.”
  9. Once the paper has been submitted, you will see the Turnitin Digital Receipt.
  10. Click on “go to inbox” to see the listing of papers submitted for this Turnitin Assignment.

Watch a video on how to submit a student paper to a Turnitin Assignment in Blackboard.

Educause Quarterly issue on Online Student Retention includes UIS strategies

Sustaining Students: Retention Strategies in an Online Program

by Emily Boles, Barbara Cass, Carrie Levin, Raymond E. Schroeder, and Sharon McCurdy Smith

Published on Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Key Takeaways

  • With students spread across 47 states and a dozen countries, the University of Illinois at Springfield faces a significant challenge in promoting student persistence.
  • Program coordinators who know each student majoring in their online degree program keep in close touch with those students to assure that their learning and academic planning needs are met.
  • Online student peer mentors who model best student practices and serve as a liaison between students and faculty members provide effective support in selected classes.
  • These and other approaches have resulted in an online course completion rate that hovers just two to three percent below the on-campus completion rate, and the degree-completion rate among online students is equally strong.

Read the complete article at: http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/sustaining-students-retention-strategies-online-program

Examity Quick-Guide for Faculty

Download the UIS Examity Quick Guide for Faculty.

1. Using Examity® with Blackboard

You will access Examity® through Blackboard. All of the data relevant to your exams will be imported automatically daily into Examity®, and Examity® will not change anything about the way you currently use Blackboard.

To use Examity in your class, you must first turn the tool on your course.  To turn the tool on, click on Customization in the Control Panel and select Tool Availability.

examity10

On the Tool Available page, you will need to put a checkmark in the box for ExamityUISSSO.

examity11

You can then add a link to Examity in your course.  In the content area in which you want the link to appear, click on Tools –> More Tools –> ExamityUISSSO.  Click submit.

examity12

This will add a link to the Examity dashboard inside your course. 

examity1

To get to your Examity® Dashboard, click on the Examity® link. You will see a screen that says “click here to login”—by clicking that button, you log into Examity® with your Blackboard user infor­mation.examity2

Once you click it, you will be taken directly to your Examity® Instructor Dashboard. You may be prompted to login as an Exam Instructor or Student.  Select Exam Instructor.

Please note: there may be a one-day delay in seeing your dashboard after enabling the Examity tool for your class, as the data link between Blackboard and Examity refreshes once per day.

2. Viewing the Examity® Dashboard

You can get to all four areas of Examity® from your dashboard by clicking on either the links at the top of the navigation bar or the icons you see when you log in.

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Clicking on the EXAM STATUS button will enable you to see the status of your students’ exams (scheduled, pending at auditor, approved/rejected by auditor, or cancelled/incomplete). This is the button to click if you want to review videos once they have been approved by our auditing team.

Clicking on STUDENT enables you to search for individual students.  If a student needs special accommodations for an exam, such as double time for the exam, that information may be entered here.

Clicking on the REPORTS button displays all the exams that are associated with you. You can filter by class, or student name, and download Excel and PDF versions of these reports to help you keep track of your students.

Clicking on COURSES/EXAMS takes you to a list of all your classes. You can edit courses here.

Please Note: The first time you visit Examity, you will need to set up your profile.  It is important for you to set up your correct time zone so that Examity knows from what time zone you are teaching.

3. Setting Up an Exam & Adding Customized Rules

The first step in setting up an exam with Examity is to make sure the exam is set to available in Blackboard. The exam should also have a password. Exams that are made available will be directly imported into our system.

Once an exam has been imported, you can enter the Examity dashboard and edit the settings of each course and exam by clicking the pencil icon under the “Action” tab. Click the arrow left of the course name to find and edit each exam for that course.

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The first part of the box asks you to fill in several items:

  • Exam Name: Midterm, Quiz 1, etc.
  • FairExam Level: this is the desired level of proctoring service required. Examity offers four levels of service.  As the instructor, you can select which level of service you want for your exam.
    • Level 0 – authenticate & record all tests
    • Level 1 – authenticate & record all tests, review a random sample of tests
    • Level 2 – authenticate & record all tests, review all tests
    • Level 3 – authenticate & record all tests, live proctor monitors & reviews all tests
  • Duration of the Exam: the length of time students get to complete the exam (1 hour)
  • Link to Access the Exam: In most cases, this will be bb.uis.edu
  • Exam Start Date: the first day in which the student can take the exam
  • Exam End Date: the last day in which the student can take the exam
  • Upload a File: If you need to provide your students with a document for their exam, such as a supplemental case study or a formula sheet, you may upload it here
  • Exam Password: If your Blackboard exam has a password, you may share the password with the proctor here.  He/she will enter the password for the student on Blackboard.
  • Extended Time/Special Accommodations: If you have a student who needs special accommodations for the exam, select Yes.  Please note: after setting up your exam, you will need to select the student(s) who needs special accommodations in the Student section of the Dashboard and enter the details of the student’s accommodation.
  • Student Upload File: If your students need to upload a file when they finish their exam, select yes.

The second part of the box establishes the rules for the exam environment. You can add special instructions here.

examity15 

Examity provides standard rules, as listed above.  To insert customized rules, such as the test is open book or that students are permitted to use a calculator, you may add them here by clicking the checkbox. Additional rules and special instructions may be inserted in the text box (click save after entering).  Click Save Exam to finalize the exam’s arrangements with Examity.

Once you have added an exam, you can see the arrangements and make changes by clicking on the arrow next to the course in your Courses/Exam section of your Examity Dashboard.

examity16

Once an exam has been arranged with Examity, students may begin scheduling their exams directly with Examity.  A sample letter for faculty to send to students about the scheduling their exam with Examity can be found on the COLRS’ website at go.uis.edu/examityemail .

**Please note: Exams will be pulled in automatically within 24 hours once the “Make the Link Available” link in Blackboard is marked to yes.  To prevent students from seeing the exam before the exam date, set the Display After and Display Until dates for the testing period.

4. Tracking Exam Status

The Exam Status section of the Examity Dashboard allows instructors to view whether students have scheduled their exams and when those exams will take place.  If a student has completed an exam, the status of the exam will indicate what stage the exam is currently in (in progress, pending at auditor, approved by auditor).

examity18

If the exam has been approved by the auditor, you will see at least two alert flags.

  • Green flags indicate no violations.  If a student is authenticated and completes the exam with no violations, he/she will have two green alert flags.
  • Yellow flags indicate possible violations.  These suggest that a violation of the rules has occurred, but the student was likely not cheating.  For example, if the students’ young child runs into the room during the exam session, the auditor will flag the violation with a yellow flag.
  • Red flags indicate violation. A violation of the exam rules has occurred. When a student receives a red flag violation, the instructor will also receive an e-mail about the incident.

Instructors can view details of the alerts and watch the exam video by clicking on the View link next to the students’ flag alerts.  Videos will remain available for 30 days, after which it is deleted from the Examity system.

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5. Reaching Examity Support

Support is available 24 hours a day.

Call: 1-(855)-392-6489 or 1-(855)-EXAMITY

Email: support@examity.com

Live Chat: Click the tab on the bottom of your screen

Examity Online Video Proctoring – Quick Guide for Students

Download the UIS Examity Quick Guide for Students.

1. Accessing Examity

You can access Examity® through your course on Blackboard. Click on the ExamityUISSSO link within the course.

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Click to login to Examity.

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This will take you to your Examity dashboard.

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From here you can edit your profile, schedule exams, and make changes if you need to cancel or change a test time. Most importantly, this is where you’ll go to start your exams.

2. Getting Started

Setting Up Your Profile: To get started, update your Examity® profile by clicking in the My Profile section of the Dashboard. You will need to upload a picture of your UIS Student ID or a government issued photo ID, select your time zone, and set your security questions.

Please note the importance of selecting the correct time zone.  This will be used in scheduling your test with the proctoring center.  You can confirm your selected time zone by looking at the time in the upper right hand corner.

Once you have set up your profile, you can bypass this step for future exams.

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Scheduling Your Exam: When you are ready to schedule an exam, click “Schedule Exam” on your dashboard or on the top navigation bar.

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You will see a calendar. If you are scheduling your test more than 24 hours in advance, you can just select the date and time you want. If you are scheduling it less than 24 hours in advance, make sure the on-demand scheduling option is enabled in the top right-hand side of the screen.

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Paying for Exam Proctoring:  You will pay for your exam proctoring session at the time you schedule the exam.  Rates for the proctoring session vary based on the length of the exam and the level of proctoring service selected by the instructor.  Additional fees apply if you use on-demand scheduling (exam occurs within 24 hours). 

Rescheduling or Canceling Your Exam: If you need to change or cancel your test appointment, click Reschedule/Cancel, and select the exam you want to change from the menu that appears.

3. Taking Your Exam

To take your exam, make sure you have your webcam and microphone set-up on your computer.  Sign into Blackboard, then your class.  Return to the Examity® Dashboard by clicking on the ExamityUISSSO sign-on link within your class.

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Click to login to Examity.

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This will take you to your Examity dashboard.

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Once on the Examity dashboard, click “Begin Scheduled Exam”, and select your exam. You will then be connected to your proctor. Note: MAKE SURE YOUR POP-UP BLOCKER IS DISABLED otherwise you will not be able to connect with your proctor!

Your proctor will walk you through the test authentication process, which will include verifying your identity, going over the exam rules, scanning your work area and desk, answering your security questions, and agreeing to the User Agreement.

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Once you have finished the authentication process, you will see a screen that says “Begin Exam”, and your exam will open. If your test is password protected, your proctor will tell you the password when the prompt to enter it appears.

4.  Reaching Examity Support. 

Support is available 24 hours a day.

  • Call: 1 (855) EXAMITY or 1 (855) 392-6489
  • Email: support@examity.com
  • Live Chat: Click the tab on the bottom of your screen

Two Examples of Blackboard Rubrics

3 Point Blackboard Discussion Rubric (click on thumbnail to enlarge)

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20 Point  Blackboard Rubric (click on thumbnail to enlarge)

20_point_rubric

Adding TEC-VARIETY — Book by Curt Bonk and Elaine Khoo

Adding TEC-VARIETY is the latest book by Curt Bonk of Indiana University, written in collaboration with Elaine Khoo, from the University of Waikato in New Zealand.

It is an OPEN book, which means it is freely available online. Download your copy at http://tec-variety.com/

Endorsement:

What a grand book! This is going to be a highly valuable resource for countless instructors and designers in online learning. “Adding TEC-VARIETY” is unique in that it combines the theoretical and pedagogical foundations of effective learning with 100 easy-to-implement activities that promote the engagement of online students in deep learning. These strategies can instantly breathe life into courses that fail to tap the enthusiasm and imagination of students. TEC-VARIETY has become a handbook for my design of engagement in online classes.

Ray Schroeder, Associate Vice Chancellor for Online Learning and Founding Director of the Center for Online Learning, Research and Service (COLRS), University of Illinois Springfield

How to Give Select Students Extra Time on a Blackboard Exam

  1. Build your test as usual and deploy in a content area.
  2. Click the drop down arrow next to the deployed test and select Edit the Test Options. The test options allow the instructor to set the testing criteria for the entire class.

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  1. Part 3 of the Test Options screen is Test Availability Exceptions. Students receiving test exceptions will receive testing criteria that varies from the rest of the class.

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  1. In Part 3, Click Add User or Group to bring up a pop-up screen. Select the user or group with the exception and click Submit.

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  1. Adjust the options as needed for that user or group.
    • Attempts may be Single Attempt, Multiple Attempt, or Unlimited Attempt.
    • Timer may be used to set the amount of time the user or group receives.
    • Availability may be used to set the time window for which the user or group may access the exam.
    • Force Completion requires the user or group to complete the exam in one sitting.

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  1. Submit the Test Options.

Adding Kaltura Media Videos to Blackboard Courses

Kaltura Media is a media management tool built into Blackboard. Recordings made with Capture Space Lite are automatically published to Kaltura. You may also upload videos you’ve created with other tools to Kaltura. Learn More about Kaltura and Capture Space Lite.

Thumbnail

The thumbnail option adds a preview image to the content area of your Blackboard. When students click on the video, it opens to full size.

  1. Navigate to your course and the content area to which you would like to add the video.
  2. Click on “Tools,” and select “Kaltura Media.”
  3. Enter your search terms (name of the video or any descriptive tags you added to your video) and click the search icon. Also, know that the most recently published videos appear at the top of the list.
  4. Click “Select” next to the video you wish to add to your course.
  5. Enter a descriptive title for the video.
  6. Click “Submit.”

Embed

  1. Log in to Blackboard.
  2. On the “My Blackboard” tab, locate the “My Media” box on the left side of the page and click on “My Media.”
  3. Enter your search terms (name of the video or any descriptive tags you added to your video) and click “Go.” Also, know that the most recently published videos appear at the top of the list.
  4. Click on the video you wish to add to your course.
  5. Click on Actions to show the menu, and then select Edit.
  6. Click on the “Share” button that appears below your video, in the lower right corner. It looks like  an arrow pointing left (See image below.)
    Kaltura Media Share button is on far right
  7. Click on the Embed Code  (bottom choice) and and copy it ( CTRL + C  or Command + C) to copy the embed code to your computer’s clipboard.
    screen capture of the Kaltura Media Share screen. The link to share the video and an embed code are displayed.
  8. Next, go to your course content area (Weekly Materials, Assignments, Syllabus, etc).
  9. Click on “Build Content,”  and then “Item.”
  10. Enter a descriptive name for the item.
  11. In the text box, be sure your menu is expanded (see image below).
    ExpandTextboxEditor
  12. Click on the “HTML” button on the text box menu. This will open a pop-up window. Paste (CTRL + V or Command + V) the code you copied to the clipboard in #6 and click “Update.”
  13. Click Submit.

Link

  1. Log in to Blackboard.
  2. On the “My Blackboard” tab, locate the “My Media” box on the left side of the page and click on “My Media.”
  3. Enter your search terms (name of the video or any descriptive tags you added to your video) and click “Go.” Also, know that the most recently published videos appear at the top of the list.
  4. Click on the video you wish to add to your course.
  5. Click on the “Actions” button that appears below the video. (See image below.)
  6. Click “Edit.”
  7. Click the “Share” icon in the lower, right-hand corner of the video. (See image below.)
  8. Click the the URL (it should begin https://cdnapisec.kaltura.com…), and press Press CTRL + C to copy the URL to your computer’s clipboard.
  9. Next, go to your course content area (Weekly Materials, Assignments, Syllabus, etc).
  10. Click on “Build Content,”  and then “Web Link.”
  11. Enter a descriptive Name for the item.
  12. Paste (CTRL + V or Command + V) the code you copied to the clipboard in #8 in the “URL” area.
  13. Under “Web Link Option,” select “yes” to open the video in a new window. If you do not open the video in a new window, students will not be able to view the video.
  14. Click “Submit.”

Add to Course Gallery

The course gallery option allows you to add a link to your course menu that takes students to all videos for your course.

Add a Course Gallery Link to your course menu

  1. Go to your course.
  2. Click on the “+” above your course menu.
  3. Choose “Tool Link”
  4. Enter a name for the link (Media Gallery or Course Videos, perhaps).
  5. Select “Media Gallery” for the Type.
  6. Check the box to make the area available to users.
  7. Click “Submit.”

Add a video to your course gallery

  1. Log in to Blackboard.
  2. On the “My Blackboard” tab, locate the “My Media” box on the left side of the page and click on “My Media.”
  3. Enter your search terms (name of the video or any descriptive tags you added to your video) and click “Go.” Also, know that the most recently published videos appear at the top of the list.
  4. Click on the video you wish to add to your course.
  5. Click on the “Actions” button that appears below the video. (See image below.)
  6. Click “Publish.”
  7. Select “Published,” and then select the individual courses to which you would like to publish the video to the media gallery.
  8. Click “Save.”

Course Availability for Students with Incompletes

A few weeks after the semester ends, a course will automatically become unavailable to all students.  If you have a student with an incomplete who needs access to a course after this occurs, the course can be made available to just that student. This is a two part process.  First, you would need to mark the course as unavailable to the other students who were enrolled in the class.  Then, you will make the course available (open) again.  Although this will open up the course again, only the student marked as available will have access. To make the course unavailable to the other students in the class:

  1. In the Control Panel, go to Users & Groups and Users.
  2. The right-most column shows the Availability of the course for each student, when the course is made available.  If the course is available, students having ‘Yes’ in that column will have access.  If the course is not available, all students will not have access.  
  3. To change a student’s availability from ‘Yes’ to ‘No’,  hover on the username for a student to make the drop-down arrow appear.  Click on the drop-down arrow and menu  and select Change User’s Availability in the Course.
  4. Change the drop-down option for Available (this course only) to be No and click Submit.
  5. Repeat steps 3 & 4 for all students who need to be made unavailable.
  6. Once completed for all students except for the student with the Incomplete, confirm that only the student with the Incomplete has ‘Yes’ in the Availability column.

To make the course available again:

  1. In the Control Panel, go to Customization and Properties.
  2. Under step 3, change the Make Course Available to Yes and click Submit.

UIS Blackboard Guest Accounts

At times, UIS faculty and staff may need to request guest users for Blackboard. Examples of uses for Blackboard guest accounts are:

  • Community members participating in band or chorus activities
  • Off-site supervisors for internships
  • Guest lecturers/presenters for courses

Blackboard accounts may be requested by completing this form: http://go.uis.edu/bbguest

Important information about UIS Blackboard guest accounts:

  • UIS faculty or staff must request Blackboard guest accounts.
  • The UIS employee who requests the guest account is responsible for enrolling the guest in the appropriate Blackboard site.
  • Blackboard guest accounts are deleted each year on August 1st to ensure security of our learning management system. If guest needs to have access again, a new guest account must be requested.

 

View Blackboard Assignment Feedback from Your Instructor

To view Feedback on Individual or Group Assignments in Blackboard

This contains instructions for viewing feedback on Blackboard Assignments for which you uploaded a file to an assignment with this icon beside it:

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  1. In your course, click on My Grades in the course menu.
  2. You will see a list of all the assignments in your class.
  3. Locate the assignment you wish to see feedback on.
  4. If your instructor has given you a grade, click on the title of the assignment to view feedback.
  5. If you submitted a Word document (.doc or .docx), PowerPoint (.ppt or. pptx) or PDF (.pdf), the feedback screen will look like this:
    instructor feedback croc doc(click on the image to enlarge it)
  6. If your instructor left feedback on the paper itself, scroll through the document to read it. To download a copy of feedback of this feedback, click on the download bb assignment feedbackdownload button above the document on the screen.
  7. If your instructor attached feedback in a file, click on the name of the file to view or save it.

My Grades Item Status

The following table describes the symbols appearing on the My Grades page.

 
Symbol Description
Item has not yet been completed. No information is available.
Item has been submitted. This item is waiting to be reviewed by your instructor.-OR-Item has been submitted. Your instructor may review this item but may not be provided a grade (for items such as surveys).
Grade Item has been graded. Click the grade or assignment title to view detailed feedback.
Attempt is in progress. This item has not been submitted. To submit the item, see Submitting a Draft Assignment.
Grade is exempted for this user. If you do not complete this assignment, it will not affect your grade.
Error has occurred. Contact your instructor.

Copying Tests, Quizzes, Surveys and Pools

Blackboard allows you to copy tests, quizzes, surveys and pools of questions from one course to another.  Here are the instructions:

1. Begin in the course that contains the test, survey or pools you would like to copy.  Go to Control Panel > Course Tools > Tests, Surveys and Pools > Choose Tests, Surveys or Pools.

2. Hover just to the right of the name of the test, survey or pool you wish to copy, and you’ll find a chevron.  Click on the chevron and choose “Export” from the drop down menu.

3. A zip file will be downloaded to your computer.

4. Next, go to the course into which you would like to copy the test.  Go to Control Panel > Packages and Utilities > Import Pack/View Logs > Import Package.

5. Click on “Browse My Computer” and select the .zip file from your downloads.  Check the box for Test, Surveys and Pools and click “submit”.

6. Once the test, survey or pool has been copied, you’ll need to deploy it in your Blackboard.  See:  http://blogs.uis.edu/colrs/2013/04/09/posting-deploying-a-test-for-students/

Mobile Learning

SlideShare Presentation: Online and on the move 

BLACKBOARD

MOBILE POLLING SITES

TWITTER IN THE CLASSROOM

ELECTRONIC TEXTBOOKS

INFOGRAPHICS
LECTURE CAPTURING
EMBEDDING DOCUMENTS
SYNCHRONOUS COLLABORATION

Turnitin Manual for Instructors

Turnitin

Click on the image above for the Turnitin Instructor Manual

 

 

Strategies for Increasing Course Evaluation Response Rates

The Timing – A barrier for course evaluation completion is timing the evaluation close to finals (Cottreau & Hatfield 2001).  At UIS, course evaluations become available three weeks prior to the end of the semester.  Thus, begin asking for feedback earlier in the semester!

You might be concerned that that timing may be too early to get accurate feedback from students, as not all activities and assignments have yet been completed.  Research has shown, however, that the results of course evaluations completed earlier in a course are highly correlated with results of course evaluations completed finals week or after (McNulty et al. 2010).  Not only do you increase the likelihood of having a higher response rate, students completing evaluations earlier provided more qualitative feedback than students completing evaluations later (McNulty et al. 2010).  At UIS, these additional (write-in) comments are provided only to the instructor and are not added to the instructor’s faculty file.

The Frequency – For online course evaluations, post announcements as many times and in as many places as you can:

  • Post the link in your syllabus.
  • Create a specific announcement about the evaluation.

Sample Announcement – Course evaluations are open online. These are very important in improving the quality of classes at UIS. They also are an important instrument used in the promotion and tenure process for faculty members. Please take a few moments to fill out the evaluations for this class and any others you may be taking that have online evaluations: https://uisapp-s.uis.edu/courseevals/login.aspx. These evaluations are available only through Saturday, May 4.Faculty members do not see the results of course evaluations until after final grades are submitted for the term. Thanks for taking the time to fill them out!

  • Include the link to the evaluation in emails and announcements until the end date (And remember the course evaluation is available at x until x date).
  • Add as an item to the course calendar

Tell Students Why It’s Important – Remind students why course evalutions are important at UIS and remind them that you cannot see the feedback until after final grades are due and that it will not impact their grade in any way.  Students are more likely to respond if they knew how their evaluations will be used and what decisions their responses will influence (Kidd & Latif 2003, Anderson et al. 2005; Cottreau & Hatfield 2001; Hatfield & Coyle 2013).  The largest factor for not completing evaluations is that students believe the evaluations will not result in change or would not benefit them (Hatfield & Coyle 2013).

The Method – For on-campus classes at UIS, faculty have the choice of having online or in-class evaluations.  Research is mixed on whether online or paper evaluations result in higher response rate, as shown below:  

  • Compared with paper surveys, online evaluations have been associated with increased response rates (Barnett & Matthews 2009; Anderson et al. 2005; Thorpe 2002; Hatfield & Coyle 2013).  
  • Online ratings produce a lower response rate than in-class ratings (Avery, Bryant, Mathios, Kang, & Bell, 2006; Benton, Webster, Gross, & Pallett, 2010 ; IDEA, 2011; Nulti, 2008).

Your class’s typical attendance rate should be considered when deciding whether the in-class or online evaluation will be more effective. 

Why are Course Evaluations Important at UIS?

Goal #1 of the UIS Strategic Plan states that “UIS will achieve academic excellence through excellence in teaching and learning and excellence in scholarship.”  Action Step #4 of the UIS Strategic Plan states that UIS will “Improve the assessment of learning outcomes and of teaching; use aggregated information from course evaluations to inform faculty development programming:  a) Establish and fund a program to support improvements in the assessment of learning outcomes and program review.  b) Adopt a new course evaluation instrument.  c) Implement a multidimensional approach to teaching evaluation.  d) Use the data from the improved teaching evaluation approach as the basis for issues addressed in faculty development programs.”

Presently, course evaluations are used for retention and promotion decisions and for course improvement.  Completion of student course evaluations is imperative in evaluating curricular trends and teaching effectiveness, particularly if no other assessment methods are performed (Hatfield & Coyle 2013).

Research suggestions that student ratings of courses and faculty are a reliable and useful method of evaluating teaching and course effectiveness (Kidd & Latif 2003).  In fact, student evaluations are as reliable as peer evaluations, provided that response rates are good (Paulsen 2002).  However, course evaluations should be used in conjunction with other evaluation tools, such as the peer evaluation and a teaching portfolio, when evaluating the effectiveness of an instructor.  Research has found that faculty members receiving the best evaluations are not always the most effective teachers according to students (Surratt & Desselle 2007).  The Dr. Fox Effect, as seen in the following video, suggests that a highly expressive presenter can earn high evaluations even when the content presented is nonsensical.

UIS Online Supplemental Evaluation Tool

The UIS online supplemental evaluation system allows faculty to administer anonymous surveys to their students. Faculty choose up to ten questions from a bank of 64 questions. Students log into the supplemental evaluation site with their UIS NetID and take the survey. If the survey is administered prior to the last two weeks of the semester, instructors see the anonymous student feedback immediately. If the survey is administered during the final two weeks of the semester, faculty may see the feedback after grades are posted. View the full description of the supplemental evaluation system.

FACULTY Online Supplemental Evaluation System

STUDENT Online Supplemental Evaluation System

Create an Evaluation 

  1. Log in to the Faculty side of the Online Supplemental Evaluation System.
  2. Click on “Create/Modify Evaluation Form” in the left menu.
  3. Click on the “Create New Evaluation Form” link.
  4. Enter the name of your evaluation in the “Version Description” field.
  5. Check the box next to the questions you would like to include. You may select up to ten.
  6. Click “Submit” to save your evaluation.

Schedule Your Evaluation

  1. Log in to the Faculty side of the Online Supplemental Evaluation System.
  2. Click on “Schedule Evaluation” in the left menu. 
  3. Click on the “Create New Schedule Entry” link.
  4. Fill out the scheduling form.
    1. Choose your course for
    2. Select the version (name of your evaluation).
    3. Choose the begin and end date.
    4. Enter any comments (notes for the instructor).
    5. Click “Submit.”
  5. Send or post the following link for your students to complete the evaluation:
    https://uisapp-s.uis.edu/ose/

Retrieve Evaluation Results

If your evaluation ends prior to the last two weeks of the semester, you may log in to see results immediately. If your evaluation ends during the last two weeks of the semester, you will be able to access the results after final grades are posted.

  1.  Log in to the Faculty side of the Online Supplemental Evaluation System.
  2. Click on the “Evaluation Results” link in the left menu. 
  3. Click on the link in the “Course” column to view the results of your evaluation.

Accessing Moodle at UIS

UIS maintains an instance of Moodle for faculty and staff use at https://uistraining1.uis.edu/login/index.php

If you have a UIS NetID, you may access the Moodle site by click on the “Continue” button on the right side of the Moodle home page.

If you are a guest user of the Moodle system, your UIS contact will send you instructions for accessing the site.

What is Respondus LockDown Browser?

Respondus LockDown Browser is a customized browser that increases the security and integrity of online testing in Blackboard.  More information on Respondus LockDown Browser can be found at the link below:

http://www.uis.edu/informationtechnologyservices/iss/respondus.html#lockdown

Horizon Report

Each year the New Media Consortium (NMC) and Educause Learning Initiative (ELI) publish the Horizon Report, a look ahead at technologies that will impact education in the next one, three, and five years.

The report “charts the landscape of emerging technologies for teaching, learning and creative expression” based on interactions with “technology professionals, campus technologists, faculty leaders from colleges and universities, and representatives of leading corporations” (from Horizon Project).

More Information

Time Management in the Online Classroom

Laurel Newman, Te-Wei Wang and Marcel Yoder led an excellent discussion about time management in online teaching. Watch the recorded Blackboard Collaborate session to learn their strategies.

Best Practices for Synchronous Sessions

Carefully Organize Your Synchronous Session

  • Make sure to create an outline for your session.
  • What topics do you want to cover?
  • What materials will you need to share?
  • What questions will you ask?

Connecting to Your Synchronous Session

  • Make sure you are using a high speed Internet connection. Audio and video sharing requires a stable, higher-bandwidth connection that some wireless networks aren’t capable of supplying.
  • Join the live session before the scheduled start time.
  • Conduct an audio check.

Synchronous Session Best Practices

  • Offer Students Options – Consider making the synchronous sessions optional or offering several sessions from which your students may choose.  Requiring synchronous sessions reduces the flexibility that appeals to, and is often necessary for the schedules of, many online students. They will appreciate your extra efforts in schedule accommodations.
  • Inform Your Students – Send an email or post information in Blackboard for your students explaining the technology and how they will use it.
  • Schedule a Trial Run – Test your web conferencing tool first, if possible, with someone who can log in from a different location as a “test audience.”  Then you can run through your materials early, checking that everything loads properly.
  • Use the Moderator Override Functions – Learn how to use moderator override functions, such as turning students’ mics down.
  • Mention Student Names – Use students’ names as frequently as possible. It grabs their attention and makes the online environment feel more personal.
  • Use Emoticons – Learn to use emoticons to substitute for facial expressions, and learn to interpret your students’ virtual facial expressions.
  • Get Comfortable with Instant Messaging – Learn to monitor the instant messaging feature while you, a guest speaker, or other students are using microphones. This ensures participants without microphones can fully participate.
  • Record Sessions – Recording your sessions allows students who could not attend to listen to the recorded session presentation.
  • Solicit Feedback – Ask for feedback from your students to help you improve content and delivery for your next course by using the polling feature

What is Synchronous Learning?

Synchronous learning employs a software that provides a way for a groups to meet online, at the same time, and verbally communicate with each other. It allows for real-time learning and collaboration. Not only can participants communicate with each other, but they can also push content to the rest of the audience, such as a presentation or a web page. Additionally, class meetings should be recorded for students unable to attend the meeting or for future use.

Ideas

  • Group Discussions
  • Debates
  • Instructor Lectures
  • Faculty and Student Presentations
  • Virtual Advising
  • Guest Speakers

Synchronous Learning Tools @ UIS

Microsoft Lync

Google+ Hangouts through the UIS Google Apps for Education

Blackboard Mobile Learn

Information about Blackboard Mobile Learn can be found at:

http://www.uis.edu/informationtechnologyservices/iss/blackboard.html

 

Testing in Blackboard: Clearing a Student’s Attempt

To clear a student’s attempt:

  1. Go the the course Control Panel
  2. Under the Assessment area, Click on Gradebook link
  3. Locate the student who you wish to reset, and click on the padlock “In Progress” icon, or the exclamation mark (!) “Completed” icon.
  4. Click on the View button to access the students’ quiz attempt page.
  5. Clear the assessment attempt by clicking on the Clear Attempt button.

Posting & Deploying a Test for Students

To deploy a test:

  1. Go to the content area where you want to deploy the test (i.e. Assignments, Course Materials, etc.)
  2. Click on the Assessments button and select Test.
  3. Click on the name of the test you wish to deploy and click OK.
  4. On the “Test Options” page that appears, you will select how and when your students will view the test.
    • Under “1. Test Information,” you will see the information you entered while creating the test. The description will appear beneath the link to the test in your content area.
    • Under “2. Test Availability,” choose from these options:
      • Make the Link Available. Select “Yes.” You can limit the availability of the test using the Display After/Until tool below. If you choose “No” students will not be able to view the exam.
      • Add a New Announcement for this Test. Select “Yes” to have Blackboard post an announcement that the test is available.
      • Multiple Attempts. If you would like students to have more than one attempt at the test, check the box for multiple attempts. Select either “Unlimited Attepmts” or “Numbers of Attempts.” If you choose “Number of attempts,” enter the specific number of times you would like your students to be able to attempt the test.
      • Force Completion. If you would like to force students to complete the test the first time they launch (click on) the test, select this option.
      • Set Timer. The timer in Blackboard does not close the exam if a student exceeds the time limit. It simply sets an expected completion time and records the length of time each student spends in the exam. Instructors can view this information in the Grade Center column for the test. To set the timer, check the “Set Timer” checkbox and enter the time in hours and minutes.
      • Display After. Check the box and enter the date and time that the test should become available to students. If the box is not checked, the dates and times will not be saved.
      • Display Until. Check the box and enter the date and time that the test should no longer be available to students. If the box is not checked, the dates and times will not be saved.
      • Password. If you wish to have students enter a password to access the exam, check the box and enter the case-sensitive password. This tool is especially useful when proctoring exams or giving make-up exams for specific students.
    • Under “3. Self-assessment Options,” instructors choose how the test results are recorded.
      • Include this Test in the Grade Center Score Calculations. This option is turned on by default. If you do not wish for the test to count toward student total grades, uncheck the box.
      • Hide Results for this Test Completely from Instructor in Grade Center. If checked, this option hides all student scores from instructors. This information cannot be recovered by instructors, ITS or COLRS. Please do NOT check this option.
    • Under “4. Test Feedback,” select the feedback you wish students to see after they complete the test: Score, Submitted Answers, Correct Answers, and/or Feedback. Unchecking all boxes until the testing period ends is a common practice. Instructors may edit the feedback option after students are finished taking the test or grading is complete.
    • Under “5. Test Presentation,” instructors choose how a test is displayed to students.
      • All at Once. All questions are displayed on a single screen. This is a good option if your test includes fewer than 20 twenty multiple choice or true/false questions. If your test includes more questions or any essay questions, please consider presenting your test with the “one at a time” option.
      • One at a Time. If your test contains more than 20 questions or any essay questions, please select the “one at a time” option. This option forces students to click a “next” button to submit their work as they move through the exam. It can help prevent browser timeout issues. When “one at a time” questions presentation is selected, instructors can choose to Prohibit Backtracking, which that students see each question only once. Students cannot access questions they have previously submitted or change their answers.
      • Randomize Questions. Students will see questions in a different order each time they attempt a test.
  5. Click Submit.

Creating a Test in Blackboard

To create a test:

  1. Go to the Control Panel.
  2. Click on Course Tools > Tests, Surveys, and Pools > Tests
  3. Click on Build Test
  4. On the next screen, enter a Name for the test.
    If you like you may also add a Description (appears below the name of the test in your content area in Blackboard), and Instructions (appears above the test questions while students take the test).
  5. Click Submit.
  6. To add a new question:
    • Click on Create Question and select the type of question you would like to add (True/False, Multiple Choice, Essay, etc.).
    • Fill out the information for that question type.
    • Click OK.
  7. To reuse one or more questions from another test or pool:
    • Click on Reuse Question and select “Find from Pool or Test.”
    • Under “1. Pools and Tests to Search,” select the Pool or Test that contains the questions you would like to copy to your new test.
    • Under “2. Criteria,” check “All” to see all the questions contained in your pool or test. Check specfic type(s) of questions to limit the questions displayed.
    • Under “3. Assign Points,” you may choose to use the points currently assigned to the questions or assign a new point value.
    • Click Search to view the questions.
    • Check the box for each question you would like to copy into your new test.
    • Click on the blue “Add Selected” button to copy the questions into your test.
  8. To include a random block of questions from a pool (for example, to randomly select 10 questions from a pool of 30):
    • Click on Reuse Question and select “Create Random Block.”
    • Under “1. Search the Pools below,” select the Pool from which you would like to draw questions.
    • Under “2. Criteria,” check “All” to include all types of questions in your randome block. Or, if you’d like to limit your random block to specific types of questions (only multiple choice or true/false), check the specfic type(s) of questions to include.
    • Also under “2. Criteria,” enter the number of questions to include and the number of points each question should be worth.
    • Click Import.
  9. When your test is complete, click OK to leave the test.
  10. To post/deploy the test for students, please see “Posting & Deploying a Test for Students.”

Supplemental Video:

http://webcast2.uis.edu/multimedia/COLRSweb/CreateTest/CreateTest.htm

View and Grade Turnitin Assignments

To view and grade Turnitin Assignments:

Watch a video on how to access the Turnitin Assignment Inbox.

  1. Go to the Blackboard course that contains the Turnitin Assignment.
  2. Go to Control Panel > Course Tools > Turnitin Assignment
  3. Click on the Turnitin Assignment you wish to view or grade to go to the inbox for that assignment.
    Hint: Here you’ll see a listing of your students. If you don’t see all your students, click on “Roster Sync.”
  4. Now you have several options:
    • To view the originality report (sources that match your student’s paper), click on the colored bar in the Similarity column.
    • To grade the assignment click on the bubble icon in the Grade column.
  5. For more information on originality reports and grading options in Turnitin, please consult the Turnitin Manual for Instructors found here: http://pages.turnitin.com/rs/iparadigms/images/Blackboard_9_Integration_Instructor_Manual.pdf

Grading a Discussion Board Forum in Blackboard

*If you have set up your forum as a Graded Forum 
To grade a forum:

  1. Click on Discussions in your Course Content Menu or go to the Control Panel > Course Tools > Discussion Board
  2. Click on the Forum you want to grade
  3. Click on the “Grade Forum” button 
  4. Click on the chevron next to the Username of the student
  5. Click on Grade
  6. Enter Grade at the top of the page
  7. Scroll down to the bottom of the page, click OK
Supplemental Video:

Creating a Turnitin Assignment in Blackboard

To create a Turnitin Assignment:

Watch a video on how to create a Turnitin Assignment.

  1. In a content area (i.e. assignments) hover over the “Assessments” button 
  2. Click on “Turnitin Assignment”
  3. Choose type (most are just paper assignments)
  4. Click on the “Next Step” button
  5. Add Assignment Title and point value 
  6. Select the start date (date of when students can start turning in their submissions) 
  7. Select due date (the last day you will allow submissions) 
  8. Post date (the date that the grades you assign will appear to your students) 
  9. Click on “more options” to change other settings (see explanation below).
  10. Click the “Submit” button.

 Assignment – Optional Assignment Settings

When creating a paper assignment, the Instructor may select to view and change any of the advanced assignment options. The advanced assignment options are viewed by clicking on Optional settings at the bottom of the assignment creation or assignment update page.

Advanced assignment options are listed and described below. When an advanced
assignment option is changed the Instructor may also select whether or not this change should be the future default for any new assignments created. This allows the Instructor to automatically create all new assignments with their preference of advanced options rather than manually selecting the advanced options for every new assignment.

Late Submission

An instructor can enable submissions after the due date and time. To enable late
submissions, use the drop down menu next to “Allow submissions after the due date?” and select yes. The default setting is no. When enabled, students will be able to submit papers after the due date and time has passed as long as that student has not already submitted a paper to the assignment.

Student submissions after the due date and time will be marked with red text in the date column of the submission in the assignment inbox. A student cannot overwrite a submission past the assignment due date and time, even if the late submission option is enabled.

Generate Originality Reports for student submissions

  • immediately (first report is final) – Originality Reports for all submissions will be generated immediately.Students cannot resubmit papers. Submissions must be deleted by the instructor to enable resubmission.
  • immediately (can overwrite reports until due date) – Originality Reports for the initial submission by each student user to this assignment will be generated immediately. Students may resubmit as often as the student wishes until the assignment due date. Originality Reports for the second or subsequent submission will require a 24 hour delay before the Originality Report begins processing. Only the latest submission is available to the instructor or student. Previous versions are removed. Originality Reports will regenerate within an hour of the due date and time to allow student submissions to compare against one another within the assignment. A change in the Originality Report similarity index may result from the regeneration of the reports. This option is typically used when students are self-reviewing and revising their submissions and able to view the Originality Report. No resubmissions are allowed after the due date and time of the assignment.
  • on due date – Originality Reports will not be generated for any submission until the due date and time of the assignment. Students may resubmit as many timesas needed until the due date and time without receiving reports. Resubmissionsmay not be made after the due date and time of the assignment.

Exclude bibliographic material from Similarity Index for all papers in this assignment?

This feature of assignment creation provides instructors with the ability to control the option whether bibliographic material will automatically be excluded from Originality Reports. The default is no. Bibliographic materials can also be included and excluded when viewing the Originality Report. This setting cannot be modified after the first paper has been submitted.

Exclude quoted material from Similarity Index for all papers in this
assignment?

This feature of assignment creation provides instructors with the ability to control the option whether quoted material will automatically be excluded from Originality Reports. The default is no. Quoted materials can also be included and excluded when viewing the Originality Report. This setting cannot be modified after the first paper has been submitted.

Exclude small matches?

This feature of assignment creation provides instructors with the ability to
automatically exclude small matches from all Originality Reports generated within this assignment. To exclude small matches click yes.

Once yes has been clicked the Exclude matches by: option window will open. Enter into either the Word Count: or Percentage: fields the numerical value for small matches that will be excluded from Originality Reports in this assignment.

Instructors can adjust the exclude small matches assignment setting at any time by clicking on the edit icon to the right of the assignment name. The excluding small matches feature can be adjusted within each Originality Report as well. With this feature instructors have greater control on sifting out smaller matches, allowing them to focus on larger, more problematic and suspect matches within Originality Reports.

Allow Students to see Originality Reports?

This feature of assignment creation provides instructors with the ability to control the option to allow students to see Originality Reports within each created assignment. This option gives instructors more flexibility and control when creating assignments. Select yes to allow students to see the Originality Report for the assignment. The default setting is no.

Repository options

The instructor may choose from 2 options in the “Submit papers to:” pull-down menu. Instructors will be able to set the Submit papers to assignment option to store student papers in the standard paper repository, in the institution paper repository,

Repository Sources for Similarity Reports

The instructor is able to select the available repository sources to compare
submissions in the assignment against. This allows an instructor to disregard a source type if the comparison against this type of source is not needed.

The available search targets are listed under Search options. The targets with a check mark are those that will be searched. To remove a search target repository, click on the check box to remove the check mark. Clicking on an empty selection box next to the repository will re-add the repository as a search target. This selection will not alter any currently generated Originality Reports or Overall Similarity Index scores.

Currently available search targets are:

  • student paper repository – works previously submitted in classes and assignments on Turnitin
  • institution paper repository – a repository of student papers for the institution
  • current and archived internet – a repository of archived and live publicly available internet pages containing billions of pages of existing content and tens of thousands of new pages added daily
  • periodicals, journals, & publications – third party periodical, journal, and publication content including many major professional journals, periodicals, and business publications

Attach a rubric to the assignment

If you would like to use a rubric to grade the papers submitted to the assignment you may use the rubric list drop down menu to select a previously created or imported rubric or you can launch the rubric manager by clicking on the Launch Rubric Manager link and create a new rubric to attach to the assignment.

Enable e-rater® grammar check?

This feature is not enabled by default and may not be available for all accounts.
This feature of assignment creation provides instructors with the option to enable the e-rater® grammar and spelling check for all submissions to the assignment. When enabled student submissions receive detailed grammar feedback in GradeMark automatically through the e-rater® technology. Select yes to enable the e-rater® engine for the assignment. If this assignment option is not available then the e-rater® grammar check is disabled for the account. Contact the Turnitin account administrator to enable the e-rater® grammar check for the account.

(Optional) Select the ETS handbook level from the drop down menu. The ETS
handbooks provide students with in depth information about the grammar errors the e-rater® technology finds in their paper.

Select the dictionary used for the spelling check.

The Categories enabled by default option allows instructors to choose which
categories of feedback are enabled when viewing assignment submissions in
GradeMark. The default is to show the feedback for every category.

Changing Advanced Assignment Option Defaults

If any changes have been made to the advanced assignment options, an additional option will be available at the bottom of the options panel. The instructor is asked Would you like to save these options as your defaults for future assignments? Select yes to have all future assignment creations use the advanced assignment options that have been selected as the default setting. Select no to continue with the previous default advanced assignment option settings.

The default settings can be changed at any time when creating a new assignment or updating an existing assignment.

Archiving and Exporting a Course in Blackboard

We spend a lot of time developing materials and courses in Blackboard. ITS performs a daily backup for “gold” and current semester courses, but it is a good idea to backup a course for yourself after major updates to content or grades. You can use the Export or Archive tool to create a backup that can be restored by COLRS should the need arise.

What’s the difference between archiving and exporting a course?

When exporting a course package you select the items from the course that you want to include. Archiving includes all of the user material and data submitted in that course. Each process generates a .zip file that can be imported into Blackboard to restore content. Contact COLRS to have your content restored.

To Archive a Course:

  1. Go to the Control Panel
  2. Click on the chevron next to “Packages and Utilities” to expand menu
  3. Click on “Export/Archive Course”
  4. Click the “Archive” button
  5. Choose option to include gradebook, click Submit

To Export a Course:

  1. Follow steps 1-3 above
  2. Click the “Export” button
  3. Choose items to include in Export package
  4. Wait a few moments, then refresh page
  5. Right click on Export File, Save As, Click OK

 

When the .zip is saved to your computer, it is a good idea to save it in Box.com or Google Drive services from UIS.

Determining Blackboard WebApp Server

To find the WebApp Server within Blackboard:

  1. Go to the Control Panel
  2. Left click on Course Tools
  3. Click on “Which WebApp Server” 
  4. Record the number for reference

Supplemental Video:

http://webcast2.uis.edu/multimedia/COLRSweb/WhichWebAppServer/WhichWebAppServer.html

Blackboard: Hiding Courses Sites in “My Courses”

Most courses close a few weeks after the end of each semester. To hide any additional courses you do not wish to view in the “My Courses” module:

  1. Log in to Blackboard.
  2. On the “My UIS” tab (the first page you see when you log in), locate the “My Courses” module.
  3. In the upper right corner of the “My Courses” module, click on the gear icon (see Fig. 1). When you hover over the gear icon, help text appears that reads “Manage My Courses Module Settings.”ManageMyCourses
    Figure 1. The Gear icon allows you to hide courses in the “My Courses” module.
  4. On the “Personalize: My courses” page, look for “1. Edit Courses List” section. Uncheck the the boxes for any courses you no longer wish to view.
  5. Click ” Submit.”

Note: Unchecking a course only removes the course from your view. You will still continue to have access to all of the courses in which you are enrolled or teach on the Courses tab in Blackboard.

Copying Content from Another Instructor’s Course Site

If you are a new instructor and need to have materials copied from another instructor’s course site, you will need to have instructor permissions in both sites. Please contact your department chair and/or the previous instructor for permissions. Once you have instructor-level access to the course site, you may copy the materials into your empty Blackboard course site.

I Can’t Find My Course Section on Blackboard

Instructors are assigned to Blackboard courses based on the UIS course schedule.  If you are not listed as the instructor of your course section in the course schedule, you will not have access to your Blackboard course site.

Please contact your program secretary or online coordinator to be listed as the instructor in the course schedule. Once listed as the instructor in the course schedule, you will have access to your course site within 24 hours.  

If access is needed more urgently, your program secretary or online coordinator can  contact COLRS to verify that you will be teaching the section.  He/she will need to provide us with the course name and number, course section, and your Net-ID.

Blackboard Course Sites for Tutorials, Projects, & Other Needs

Blackboard course sites are not automatically created for tutorials or graduate projects. If you would like a Blackboard course site for one-on-one work with a student, please contact COLRS.  If applicable, please provide the course name and course number.

Blackboard course sites can also be created for department uses, campus committees, and campus organizations.  UIS faculty or staff members can contact COLRS to make a request.

 

Joining Two or More Course Sections in One Blackboard Site

If you are teaching two or more sections of the same course, you may wish to combine them into a single Blackboard course site.

Combining Blackboard sections can lead to extremely large and difficult to manage discussion forums and/or confusion for students if you choose to combine an online course and a F2F course.

To request a combined course site, please complete this form.  You will need to know the course name, number, and the section numbers of the sections to combine.

Blackboard Gold Courses

A Gold Course is special type of Blackboard course site that is named “GOLD – Name of your course” and is identified with a “999” prefix.  A Gold Course is never deleted and is backed up daily.

How do I use a Gold Course?

  • Gold Courses can be used to develop and update your course content.  Editing your content in a Gold Course rather than a teaching course site preserves your student’s work in case of grade challenges.
  • Gold Courses are ‘clean’ versions of your courses.  Students are never enrolled and you will never teach within a Gold Course.
  • Gold Courses can be copied into the empty Blackboard course sites that are created for your course sections each semester.
  • Hint: Make your content unavailable (hidden from students) in your Gold Course. When you copy to your course shells (empty Blackboard site for the semester), you simply have to release it.

How do I get a Gold course?

Contact COLRS to request the creation of a Gold Course. We will need to know the name, department, course number of the course (CHE 301 or ART 441).  Also, if you would like an existing course copied into your Gold Course’s shell, please let us know the semester and section of the originating course.

One Gold Course may be requested for each course format you teach: 8-week, 16-week, online, blended, and on-ground.

Blackboard Course Creation

Each semester, a Blackboard course shell is created for each course section offered at UIS. The course name begins with the year and semester.

Example: A chemistry course taught in Fall 2013 might be named: 133CHE10154321

13 – Last two digits of year
3 – Fall semester (spring is coded as a 1 and summer is coded as a 2)
CHE – Three digit department abbreviation
101 – Course number
54321 – Course reference number from Banner

Additional Course Creation Points

  • Instructors listed in the course schedule will have access to their empty Blackboard course sites at http://bb.uis.edu
  • Students are enrolled automatically two weeks prior to the first day of class each semester.
  • Students cannot access a course until it is either (1) automatically opened on the first day of classes according to the published academic calendar, or (2) opened by the instructor prior to the first day, if desired.
  • Instructors who are not teaching an online class can choose whether to use the Blackboard course. If you will not use the site, you can make the site unavailable to your students.
  • Each course contains an announcement stating the Blackboard course site may or may not be used at the instructor’s discretion.
  • If a student drops or withdraws from a class, he/she is not automatically removed because course grades and statistics would be removed along with the student.
  • You can hide a student instead of removing them permanently.

What is Blackboard?

Blackboard is a web-based course management learning system that instructors can use to organize course content. Instructors can manage the content to provide students with supplemental materials in a blended course format or full-course activities such as blogs, journals, and assignments for an online class.There are many tools such as the discussion boards, virtual chat and classroom, self and peer assessment which allow for increased communication and collaboration.

Blackboard has an easy to navigate interface for students and a simple file upload process that requires no knowledge of HTML coding or web-based formatting. However, if you are comfortable with HTML you can use the programming language to structure and enhance your course within Blackboard.

Blackboard allows faculty members 24/7 access to their course for instructional updates and design.

Voicethread

Voicethread is a Web 2.0 tool for conversations around media — images, documents/powerpoint slides, and videos. Students and faculty can make comments using video (from a web cam), audio (upload audio file or phone in comments), or text (typing).

Ideas for Use

  • Icebreakers
  • Interactive lectures
  • Student presentations with authentic peer assessment
  • Group and personal reflections

How to Access

VoiceThread is free for K-12 educators, but not for higher education. Pricing is based on who needs to create and how often.  COLRS purchased a small number of licenses for Voicethread to explore the technology. If you are interested in trying this technology in your class, please experiment with a free account which allows you to create three Voicethreads for free. If you find you use Voicethread heavily, please contact us for a full license.

Helpful Hints

More Information

Turnitin Plagiarism Detection

The Internet has perpetuated the age old problem of plagiarism. Turnitin can assist faculty in detecting and preventing plagiarism. It is also an excellent assignment collection, grading, and feedback tool, and can be used as an online collaborative learning tool where students can get feedback from their classmates.

View a video overview of Turnitin.

The Turnitin database includes:

  • Over 10 Billion Web Pages Crawled & Archived
  • Over 70 Million Student Papers
  • Over 10,000 Major Newspapers, Magazines & Scholarly Journals
  • Thousands Of Books Including Literary Classics
  • Printable Reports
  • Side-By-Side Comparison

Turnitin provides the ability for faculty to:

  • Quickly and conveniently identify how much material in a student’s paper is available on the Internet.
  • Deter students who may otherwise be tempted to use sources inappropriately.
  • Address the issue of proper citation of sources in a paper.
  • Pick up tips for writing assignments that discourage plagiarism and encourage independent thought.
  • Find handouts for students on plagiarism, proper citation, and writing and research skills

Ideas for Using Turnitin

  • Peer-to-Peer Paper Review’s
  • Electronic Writing Portfolio’s
  • Online Commenting
  • Multiple Rubric Grading

How to Access

Turnitin is an available tool within Blackboard.  The ‘Turnitin Assignments’ link can be found under the Course Tools section of the Control Panel.  If that link is not there, you will need to add the Turnitin tool to your course by clicking on ‘Tool Availability’ under the Customization section of the Control Panel.

Turnitin Resources

Other Resources

A Template for Feedback

A publication by Virginia Commonwealth University provides 7 Steps for Providing Constructive Online Discussion Feedback Successfully.  Their suggested template for feedback includes:
  1. Start with something positive – “You did very well in this week’s discussion.”
  2. State the grade and reason right away – “This week you earned 20/25 points.”
  3. State the correction as a reminder or recommendation – “Remember, five postings are needed for full participation points.”
  4. Provide an example or tip to reach the goal – “Here’s an example of a solution that earned full points.”
  5. State your expectation – “In the upcoming weeks, I will be looking for….”
  6. Remind them of available help – “Your success is important to me, so please email me when you have questions.”
  7. End with something motivational – “This was a tough assignment, but you did well overall.”
The complete article can be found here.

Students’ Expectations Regarding Feedback

Journal of Educators Online study of online graduate students looking at what should be included in effective feedback and how should effective feedback be provided to students found five themes of effective instructor feedback:

Themes of Effective Instructor Feedback

Theme

Summary

Student Involvement and Individuation Effective feedback is a mutual process involving both student and instructor.

  • Feedback should include personalized messages & examples that reflect the student’s contributions
  • Feedback should be private
Being Positively Constructive Effective feedback provides constructive guidance that builds confidence.

  • Feedback should be positive, encouraging & friendly
  • Feedback should provide suggestions for improvement
Gentle Guidance Effective feedback guides through explicit expectations and ongoing coaching.

  • Feedback should create structure & guidance
  • Feedback should provide clear ground rules & state expectations
Timeliness Timelines for effective feedback are mutually established and met.

  • Feedback should be prompt
  • Instructor should set expectations on time frame for feedback & announce if time frame will not be met
Future Orientation Effective feedback is applicable to future situations.

  • Feedback should guide students on how to improve for future class activities

Advantages of Online Group Work

Online group work provides several advantages to students.  Two major advantages include:

1.  Increased socialization and connectivity with classmates.  Some activities that could help groups become more connected include posting pictures, sharing details about themselves (e.g., work experiences, hobbies), and starting a discussion board to discuss non-classroom topics (e.g., current events, items of interest).

2.  An opportunity to develop and practice group and team skills, including problem-solving, project management, and asynchronous and synchronous communication.

What other advantages does online group work provide your students?

Online Groups & Individual Personalities

Understanding individual personalities can help students (and faculty) handle unproductive situations within group work.  Elearners identify five personalities that can cause distribution to group dynamics and provides suggestions for working with those personalities within a group.

Students can complete a Team Style Inventory to find out their dominate and preferred personality when in a team or group setting.

One common problem groups experience among team members is the  “free-rider” or social-loafing team member.  Wikibooks identifies several causes of social loafing.  Some things faculty can do to reduce social loafing from occurring within a group include:

  • Create appropriate group sizes for the project.
  • Make individual contributions meaningful; create task interdependence among group members.
  • Promote the use of tools that capture individual contributions to make each student’s contributions more visible (e.g., wiki, Google Docs)
  • Encourage groups to have a progress-checker, to hold members accountable for contributions and to remind them of deadlines and expectations. 

Another problem experienced by groups is a dominating group member.  The following site provides a useful table of Assertive vs. passive vs. aggressive behavior .

 

Group Norms: A Tool for Decreasing Online Group Conflict

Each member of an online group will have his or her own expectations of how the project should be completed and how it develops.  Students might find it  worthwhile for their group to establish a set of norms, or common expectations, early in the group work so that each group member has a similar understanding of issues.  Some considerations include:

  • How will the group function?  Will someone serve as the group leader or will everyone be responsible for keeping the group moving forward?
  • When will the group meet?  Will the group meet asynchronously, synchronously or a combination?
  • What technology will the group use to support the decision making process of the group (e.g., E-mail, Blackboard Group Discussion Board, Blackboard Group Chat, Voice-Over-IP, Telephone Conference Calls)?
  • What technology will the group use to support the resource-sharing process of the group (e.g., e-mailing resources as attachments, posting resources as attachments to the Blackboard Group Discussion Board, posting resources to a wiki)?
  • What technology will the group use to support the creation of the group paper (e.g., e-mailing versions of the paper as attachments, posting versions of the paper as attachments to the Blackboard Group Discussion Board, hosting the paper online using a Wiki or GoogleDocs)?
  • When will tasks be completed? Will the group stagger the completion of the various tasks or will it all be completed at once?
  • Who will complete various tasks?  Will individuals be assigned to different tasks or will the group work collectively on all tasks?

Instructors can encourage groups to develop these norms early in the group project by making it a required activity after the groups are formed.

Collaborative tools, such as the group wiki tool in Blackboard, could be used for the members to collectively develop the norms.

Student Resources for Group Effectiveness

The following resources may be worth sharing with your students as they prepare to work as a member of an online group.  Please share others that you use as a comment.

Group Work: Considerations for the Instructor

When should we use group work?

In  the Faculty Focus article “How to Design Effective Online Group Work Activities,” Mary Bart writes that we should “design tasks that are truly collaborative, meaning the students will benefit more from doing the activity as a group than doing it alone.”  Her articles goes on to quote Jean Mandernach:

“Too often we give students an activity and call it group work when in reality it’s something they could do on their own. Then we get frustrated when they don’t work together and just do the work on their own.”

The article recommends group work for assignments for which:

  • “There’s no right answer, such as debates, or research on controversial issues.”
  • “There are multiple perspectives, such as analyzing current events, cultural comparisons, or case studies.”
  • “There are too many resources for one person to evaluate, so a jigsaw puzzle approach is needed with each student responsible for one part.”

Be sure to check out the “Online Group Work Instructor Checklist” at the end of the article. 

Assessing Individual Contributions to Group Work

How do I assess individual contributions?

Use technology. Promote the use of tools that capture individual contributions through versioning. Examples of tools provided by UIS:

Implement peer evaluation. Allow group members to evaluation one another and themselves and incorporate this evaluation into the final grades for the group project.

  • Google Forms can be used to collect data in a spreadsheet for analysis and grading. View a sample form.
  • Asking each student to fill out a worksheet and submit it through the assignments tool in Blackboard is another option. View a sample worksheet.

Resolving Conflicts in Online Group Work

Often group conflicts aren’t revealed to the instructor until the end of the project. Encouraging or requiring progress reports or feedback from students at specific intervals may help you to identify trouble spots. 

For semester-long projects, a mid-semester feedback form is useful. In “Online Groups and Social Loafing: Understanding Student-Group Interactions,” Piezon and Donaldson suggest including multiple evaluation points so that “group members are aware that their contributions are salient and being observed by others. Members who are performing poorly are given several opportunities to increase their performance.”

Another strategy is to prevent conflicts by keeping the groups on track and on task by requiring small deliverables for the project throughout the semester. 

Viewing Narrated Lectures (Impatica) for Students

This video covers how to us the controls for Impatica lectures. It covers the especially important method for switching between Flash and HTML5 mode for viewing the lecture in different browsers. If you create narrated lectures using Impatica software, you may want to share this video with your students.

Blended Learning Toolkit

http://blended.online.ucf.edu/

“Based upon proven research and informed by practical experience, this Blended Learning Toolkit will offer guidance, examples, professional development, and other resources to help you prepare your own blended learning courses and programs.”

Constructivism

The following is from Constructivism and Online Education by Doolittle:

Constructivism is a theory of knowledge acquisition, not a theory of pedagogy; thus, the nexus of constructivism and online education is tentative, at best. Constructivism posits that knowledge acquisition occurs amid four assumptions:

  1. Knowledge involves active cognizing by the individual.
  2. Knowledge is adaptive, facilitating individual and social efficacy.
  3. Knowledge is subjective and self-organized, not objective.
  4. Knowledge acquisition involves both sociocultural and individual processes.

These four assumptions have led, indirectly, to eight primary pedagogical recommendations:

  1. Learning should take place in authentic and real-world environments.
  2. Learning should involve social negotiation and mediation.
  3. Content and skills should be made relevant to the learner.
  4. Content and skills should be understood within the framework of the learner’s prior knowledge.
  5. Students should be assessed formatively, serving to inform future learning experiences.
  6. Students should be encouraged to become self-regulatory, self-mediated, and self-aware.
  7. Teachers serve primarily as guides and facilitators of learning, not instructors.
  8. Teachers should provide for and encourage multiple perspectives and representations of content.

The question then arises, can an online medium support this pedagogy that is based on the constructivist assumptions?

More on Constructivism

Proctored Exams

Some UIS instructors may require proctored exams. When a UIS online student needs to take an exam, he or she will be required to make arrangements in advance for the exam to be proctored (supervised).

COLRS offers some forms that may be helpful for instructors and students in arranging for proctors. Please see the Online Teaching at UIS: Proctored Exams page for more information.

Hide and Remove Users in Blackboard

When you wish to restrict a student’s access to your Blackboard course due to a drop or withdrawal, you have two options: hide or remove the user.

The official system of record for course rosters is in Enterprise Self-Service. Please always check your roster before hiding or removing student users.

Option 1: Hide the Blackboard Course from Student, but Retain Student Grades

  1. Go to the Control Panel and click on Users and Groups > Users.
  2. Select “Username” and “List All” in search options and click Go. All users will be listed.
  3. If you have more than 25 students, click on the “Show All” button in the lower right corner of Blackboard to view all students on one page.
  4. Hover over the name of the student whose access you wish to restrict, and click the dropdown arrow.
  5. Choose “Change User’s Availability in Course.”
  6. Under “1. Available (this course only),” select “No.”
  7. Click Submit.
  8. The student will no longer have access to your Blackboard, but will be visible in your Grade Center.

To hide a student in your Grade Center:

  1. Go to Control Panel.
  2. Click on the dropdown arrow next to Grade Center.
  3. Click on Full Grade Center.
  4. Click on the “Manage” button, and select “Row Visibility.”
  5. Check the box next to the student that you wish to hide.
  6. Click on the “Hide Rows” button.
  7. Click “Submit” to save your changes.

Option 2: Delete student from Blackboard and delete student’s work
Removing a student from your Blackboard course roster also removes his or her grades from the Blackboard Grade Center.

If you would like to remove a student from your course, you can do so by following these steps.

  1. Go to the Control Panel and click on Users and Groups > Users.
  2. Select “Username” and “List All” in search options and click Go. All users will be listed.
  3. If you have more than 25 students, click on the “Show All” button in the lower right corner of Blackboard to view all students on one page.
  4. Hover over the name of the student whom you wish to delete, and click the dropdown arrow. (This will also delete all grade records in Blackboard for that student.)
  5. Choose “Remove Users from Course,” and click “OK.”

If you need assistance to hide or remove students from your Blackboard course, please contact COLRS (http://www.uis.edu/colrs/contact.html)

Short URL for these instructions: http://go.uis.edu/hidestudents

Make Blackboard Course Available to Students

To make a course available to students:

  1. Go to the Control Panel.
  2. Click on Customization > Properties.
  3. Under Set Availability, choose “Yes.”
  4. Click Submit.
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